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This is a two-part challenge!

Target Audience
  • Students
Hosting Center(s)
  • Johnson Space Center
  • Goddard Space Flight Center
  • Stennis Space Center
Subject Category
  • Physical Science
Unit Correlation
  • Exploring NASA Missions
  • Exploring Engineering and Technology
Grade Level
  • 05-08
  • 09-12
Minimum Delivery Time
  • 050 min(s)
Maximum Connection Time
  • 050 min(s)

Event Focus

Using your research skills and applying your knowledge of flight dynamics, can you design a shoebox to glide?

 

Description

This module is appropriate for video conferencing AND web conferencing.

 

NOTE: If you are registering for one or more challenges, please keep in mind that this system only allows registration for four events per day. Should you register for multiple challenges, it is suggested that you register your part 2 connections immediately after part one.

 

Join NASA in this unique design challenge in which your students will apply theoretical knowledge with design limitations to produce a working glider model. Students will experience the team planning and design challenges needed to carry through a design concept to a successful demonstration in the world of aeronautical engineering.

 

**  Challenges are a two-connection activity generally scheduled about 2 to 4 weeks apart, and must be registered for separately! **

 

**This page is for requesting Part 1! After you have registered for Part 1, and received an event ID number, please go immediately back into our catalog and register for Part 2.**

 

Can a Shoebox Fly Challenge – Part 1

During the first videoconference, students will interact with a NASA Education Specialist and learn about the past and future efforts of flight and aircraft designs, as well as the principals of lift and how to calculate the glide slope ratio. Students will then be issued a challenge to make a shoebox fly.

 

Can a Shoebox Fly Challenge – Part 2

During the second videoconference, students will do formal presentations back to the NASA Education Specialist to show their end design and calculated glide slope ratios as determined by their test flights. The flight test information should be presented back to NASA using visuals such as PowerPoint or videos to demonstrate their results.

 

 

 

 

 

Instructional Objectives

 

Engage

 

Learners will share prior knowledge about flight dynamics, aircraft design, and NASA’s history in aeronautics with the NASA Education Specialist.

Explore

Learners will discover NASA’s past, present, and future efforts in flight and aircraft designs.

 

Explain

Learners will understand the principals of lift, discover how the four forces of flight affect an aircraft, and how calculations, such as glide-slope ratio, describe the flight of an aircraft by observing on-camera demonstrations.

Elaborate

Learners will demonstrate their understanding of flight to the design, construction, and test flight of a shoebox-based glider, and collect measurements to calculate glide-slope and aspect ratios.

Evaluate

Learners will present their results to the NASA Education Specialist during the second connection through visual and oral summaries of their design and test solutions.

 

 
 

Sequence of Events

 

Pre-Conference Activities

 

 

"Design and Fly a Shoebox Glider" Activity:

Students will work individually or in teams to design, build and test their own shoebox glider.

 

5-12 Shoebox Challenge Educator Guide            

 

Shoebox Challenge Pre-Activities            

 

Shoebox challenge Explanation            

 

Glide-Slope Ratio Explanation            

           

 

 

Videoconference Activities

 

 

During the first videoconference, students will interact with a NASA Education Specialist and learn about the past and future efforts of flight and aircraft designs, as well as the principals of lift and how to calculate the glide slope ratio. Students will then be issued a challenge to make a shoebox fly.

 

Post-Conference Activities

 

 

 

Students will engage in an engineering challenge where they will design, construct, and test their shoebox glider.  The flight tests will report their results on distance traveled, height of glider launches, as well as glide slope and aspect ratios for their aircraft.  The results will be presented by the students to the NASA Education Specialist during a second videoconference connection approximately 2 to 4 weeks after the first videoconference.  The flight test information should be presented back to NASA using visuals such as the glider itself, Power Points, videos, or still imagery to demonstrate their results. 

 

 

 

Standards

 

 

 

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Page Last Updated: October 29th, 2013
Page Editor: NASA Administrator