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ODYSSEY ORBITER SETS MARTIAN LONGEVITY RECORD
12.15.10
 
NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter has worked longer at Mars than any other spacecraft in history. It entered orbit around Mars on Oct. 24, 2001.  On Dec. 15, 2010, the 3,340th day since that arrival, Odyssey passed the Martian career longevity record set by its predecessor, Mars Global Surveyor, which operated in orbit from Sept. 11, 1997, to Nov. 2, 2006.

Center Contact:  Guy Webster,818-354-6278
HQ Contact: Dwayne C. Brown, 202-358-1726
For more information: www.nasa.gov/odyssey

 
Jeffery Plaut, Odyssey Project Scientist

Cut 1 - (00:20) - “It’s a real tribute to the Odyssey team, the people who built the spacecraft, designed the instruments, and operate the spacecraft over the years that we have been able to establish this record over nine years of continuous operation in Mars. It is really a remarkable achievement. “
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Jeffery Plaut, Odyssey Project Scientist

Cut 2 - (00:37) – “Perhaps the most well known accomplishment of the Odyssey science was the discovery of vast amounts of water ice frozen into the ground in the upper few feet of the terrain of the arctic regions both north and south.What this discovery led to was development of those areas with a lander and this became the Phoenix mission. Phoenix actually scrapped away the soil and touched the ice and brought samples into it and confirmed that water ice is present.”
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Jeffery Plaut, Odyssey Project Scientist

Cut 3 - (00:33) – “It has been personally gratifying for me to participate in such a successful mission and it is a remarkable group of people that are behind the mission that make it successful. It is not just the hardware but the people who work on this mission everyday to make sure it succeeds. I think Odyssey has left its mark in history of Mars science all thanks to efforts of all these people.”
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