NASA Audio File

Kepler Mission Discovers Two Planets Transiting Same Star
08.26.10
 
NASA's Kepler Mission has discovered the first confirmed planetary system with more than one planet transiting the same star. The announcement of the discovery of the two planets, Kepler 9b and 9c, is based on seven months of observations of more than 156,000 stars being monitored for subtle brightness changes as part of an ongoing search for Earth-size planets outside our solar system. Scientists designated the sun-like star Kepler-9.

TRT: 01:20
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For more information: www.nasa.gov/kepler

William Borucki, Kepler Principal Investigator, NASA Ames

Cut 1 RT: 00:22 - “Kepler has found about 700 candidate planets.  Several of these appear to be stars, we have multiple planets going around them.  But we’re announcing today our first discovery of a proven pair of planets orbiting a single star. We know their orbital periods, we know their sizes and we know their masses.”
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William Borucki, Kepler Principal Investigator, NASA Ames

CUT 2 RT: 00:20 - “The planets are the size about Saturn. So they’re quite a bit bigger than Earth, maybe about three times or four times larger than the Earth. And these planets are hot. They have orbital periods of 19 days and 38 days, well inside the orbit of Earth or Mercury in fact.  So they’re very hot and they’re certainly gas planets.”
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William Borucki, Kepler Principal Investigator, NASA Ames

CUT 3 RT: 00:16 - “The transit timing method works by having the timing of the planet when it goes in front of the star, the star dims.  So we measure that time and we measure when it happens again. That’s the orbital period.  If that varies a little bit, that tells us about the planets that are orbiting that star.”
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