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Transcript: This Week at NASA, October 24 - 28
10.28.05

THIS WEEK AT NASA FOR FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2005

WHEW! - KSC

Hurricane Wilma may have caused extensive damage on both Florida coasts and the Keys. But, NASA's Kennedy Space Center was spared the storm's wrath. According to Kennedy's Damage Assessment Team, problems were limited to water leaks, missing shingles, overturned trees, and isolated power outages. NASA's spaceflight hardware appeared to sustain no damage.

PUT TO THE TEST - SSC

For the first time since Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast, NASA's Stennis Space Center has returned to its primary business - testing space shuttle main engines. On October 23, engineers sucessfully test-fired an engine for 520 seconds, more than 8 1/2 minutes -- the length of time a shuttle takes to reach orbit.

JOB FAIR - SSC

Also at Stennis, NASA and Computer Sciences Corporation hosted a job fair October 22nd to highlight upcoming opportunities for professionals at NASA's Shared Services Center. When fully operational, the NSSC will provide administrative and customer support for all NASA employees and contractors, adding up to 450 jobs to the economy of the Mississippi Gulf Coast region.

CONGRESSIONAL VISIT – JSC

U.S. Representatives Ken Calvert, Republican of California and Democrats Sheila Jackson Lee and Al Green, and Tom DeLay, Republican of Texas visited NASA's Johnson Space Center October 24. Calvert, Jackson Lee and Green spoke with Expedition 12 Commander Bill McArthur and Flight Engineer Valery Tokarev aboard the international space station. The group’s visit included a tour of the center, updates on NASA's human space flight programs and the viewing of a mockup of the agency's next spacecraft.

SKY SHOW - DFRC

NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center displayed some of its specialized aircraft and related exhibits during an open house and air show at Edwards Air Force Base. The blue, high desert sky was the backdrop to stirring flight demonstrations of a variety of aircraft. On the ground, numerous air and space vehicles were on display, ranging from model Mars Rovers to the modified 747 space shuttle carrier aircraft.

REMEMBERING ROSA PARKS - DFRC

Also at Dryden, the news of Rosa Park's death October 25th had employees recalling a visit by the civil rights pioneer in February of 1993. Parks helped observe Black History Month with an inspirational speech to a filled center auditorium.

SOT ROSA PARKS: "… I think as soon as we could get rid of the slave mentality we were on our way to trying to struggle for freedom. We still, today, have a long way to go and we have to continue our work.

SPACE SUITCASES – LARC

The wait is over for the Materials International Space Station Experiment, or MISSE team. After their three-year stay in space, two MISSE suitcases were opened recently in a clean room at NASA’s Langley Research Center. The project’s principal investigators opened two Passive Experiment Containers, or PECs, and immediately began inspecting the materials inside. NASA and its partners in industry and government are conducting a series of Misse experiments to study the effects of space environments on different materials.

TOPS IN TECHNOLOGY - GRC

The seventh annual Turning Goals into Reality awards ceremony was hosted by NASA's Glenn Research Center October 25th. The awards recognize NASA employees, industry and university partners for technological achievements that help advance aeronautics research and education, and make air travel safer, quieter, and more efficient.

SPACE EXPLORATION INNOVATIONS - ARC

Eleven teams from throughout North America were at NASA Ames Research Center October 19 and 20th. They participated in two Centennial Challenges promoting technical innovation in space exploration. The Beam Power Challenge had contestants using robotic climbers to try and scale a 200-foot cable powered only by a beam from an industrial searchlight. The task was so difficult that only two of the seven competitors were able to make it part way up the tether. The Beam and Power Challenge was part of the Centennial Challenges program sponsored by NASA and conducted by the Spaceward Foundation.

SPACEBALL FEVER ! - JSC

SOT: COLONEL BILL McARTHUR “…Hi, I’m Colonel Bill McArthur, Commander of the International Space Station. To my left, is my Russian crewmate Colonel Valery Tokarev. Valery and I are big Astros fans and we couldn’t be prouder that our Astros are in the world series.”

Baseball fever was caught on the international space station, where Commander McArthur and Flight Engineer Tokarev took time out from their work to offer good luck and best wishes to the Houston Astros as they battle the Chicago White Sox in the 2005 World Series.

SOT: COLONEL BILL McARTHUR “…Go Astros! “

Unfortunately, even the station crew's temporary onboard ban on white sox couldn't help the baseball Astros, who lost to Chicago in four straight.

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