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Transcript: This Week at NASA, October 17-21
10.21.05

TW@N for 10-21-05
WHOPPING WILMA – JSC
Startling views of Hurricane Wilma in the south Caribbean Sea were captured throughout the week by the international space station's external cameras. Packing winds of up to 175 miles an hour, this category 5 storm recorded the lowest barometric pressure readings ever seen in the western hemisphere.

21 STORMS - GSFC
With the formation of Wilma on October 15th, 2005 may go down in the record books as having the most named tropical storms since the year 1933. Currently, we are matching the record of 21 for the number of named storms in a hurricane season. Wilma reached Hurricane status on October 18th.

NEW MOON VIEW - GSFC
NASA Headquarters hosted a news conference October 19, to unveil new Hubble Space Telescope images of the moon's surface in ultraviolet light.

Jennifer Wiseman (SOT): "…Today we are presenting a first look at some fascinating observations of the moon. These observations were designed to provide an unusual dual benefit – benefits both for lunar science and also for potential applications for human exploration of the moon."

Observation areas included the Apollo 15 and Apollo 17 moon landing sites. Using Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys, preliminary assessments suggest a newly discovered abundance of titanium and iron oxides on the lunar surface. Both substances may be sources of oxygen for use by future teams of human space explorers.

LADY IN RED - JPL
NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has captured a stunning infrared view of Messier 31, the famous spiral galaxy also known as Andromeda. Andromeda is the most studied galaxy outside our own Milky Way. Spitzer's sensitive infrared eyes have detected captivating new features, including an off-centered ring of star formation and a hole in the galaxy's spiral disk of arms. These asymmetrical features may have been caused by interactions with satellite galaxies that surround Andromeda.

DIONE FLYBY - JPL
The Cassini spacecraft’s only close flyby of the grayish moon Dione on October 11th revealed a frigid ice world. Cassini came within 310 miles of the Saturnian moon's surface.

ET ON A ROLL - KSC
The Space Shuttle's external fuel tank #120 was rolled out of the Vehicle Assembly Building October 13, 2005 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center and loaded onto a barge headed for the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. The tank will undergo modifications and then return to Kennedy Space Center for a future launch.

LOOK MA! NO HANDS! - ARC
The Ames Research Center Marscape Facility recently held a demonstration of Human-Robotics Interaction. NASA researchers envision human-robot cooperation that will enable exploration of, and construction on, the moon and Mars. Because human crews will be limited to small teams, astronauts will need robot 'helpers' to do much of each team's work. Scientists believe that remotely controlled machines and robots working entirely on their own are possible. The NASA-Ames team will focus on robots primarily controlled by people, but will also have the capability to operate independently.

COLLINS MEETS COURIC - HQ
Eileen Collins, NASA's First Female Shuttle Commander made a guest appearance on NBC’s Today Show October 18th as part of series on Women In Leadership Roles. Collins discussed several issues with host Katie Couric, including the need for more women in the space program and her feelings on being a role model.

Eileen Collins (SOT): "… It's taken awhile to get women in the military to get the skills needed to be a Shuttle Commander, test piloting, flying high performance aircraft. I hope that my role is that of a role model so young women can see me and say that’s something that they can do someday."

Courtesy:NBC


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