NASA TV's This Week @NASA, Week Ending Feb. 15

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NASA TV's This Week @NASA, Week Ending Feb. 15
02.15.08
 
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This Week At NASA …

BABY BLANKET OF DUST - JPL
The Spitzer Space Telescope has caught a glimpse of newborn stars beneath the blanket of dust in which they were born. The stars were discovered in an area called "Rho Oph" by astronomers. It’s one of the closest star-forming regions to our own solar system. This color-enhanced movie of Rho Oph's main cloud, Lynds 1688, was created with data from Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer. The colors reflect the relative temperatures and ages of the various stars: the reddish ones are younger, the blue more mature.

ORION SYSTEM TESTED - ARC
Wind tunnel tests were conducted at the Ames Research Center on the Alternate Launch Abort System for the Orion crew module. A 7.5%-scale model of the system covered with pressure-sensitive paint was assessed in the Ames Unitary Wind Tunnel. Researchers tested the model from low through supersonic speeds, and simulated the aerodynamic pressures the system might undergo during Orion crew module abort scenarios. The Ares I Launch Vehicle will propel the Orion spacecraft to the International Space Station and the moon.

NASA HELPS WITH SWIMSUIT DEVELOPMENT - LaRC
At the Langley Research Center, aerospace engineer Steve Wilkinson did some wind tunnel testing of a very different nature. At the request of swimsuit manufacturer, Speedo, Wilkinson has run a selection of more than 60 fabrics through a small window tunnel to test for "drag," or hydrodynamic resistance. The idea, of course, was to identify which materials have lower "drag" to increase competitive swimmers’ times.

Steve Wilkinson, NASA Aerospace Engineer: "…About 30 to 35% of the drag, the restraining force on a swimmer as they move through the water, is due to what we call viscous drag and that’s what we’re simulating in this tunnel." For decades, Langley drag reduction research has been used for spacecraft, aircraft, and even America's Cup boats and now swimsuits will benefit from this technology. Langley will test 60 more fabrics for Speedo over the next two years.

BLACK HISTORY MONTH PROFILE: ANDREA B. MOSIE
In honor of Black History Month, NASA salutes Andrea Mosie, program manager of the Lunar Curatorial Lab at the Johnson Space Center.

Andrea Mosie: "…I work in the Lunar Curatorial Laboratory which is working with the moon rocks, which are our National Treasure." In a highly regulated and monitored clean room…

Andrea Mosie: "We process the samples, examine them, send them out to scientists all over the world for examination and analysis." Mosie has been with NASA for more than 32 years, joining the agency following a summer internship. Mosie, who has a Masters in Physical Science with a concentration in Geology, delights in knowing the Lunar Curatorial lab is the only place like it in the world.

50 YEARS OF NASA HISTORY -- SPOTLIGHT ON FRIENDSHIP 7 - HQ
On Feb. 20, 1962, Mercury astronaut John Glenn became the first American to orbit the Earth.

John Glenn: "Roger Zero G and I feel fine, capsule is turning around."

Glenn's Friendship 7 capsule rode an Atlas rocket into space, then made three orbits of the Earth before landing in the Atlantic 800 miles southeast of Bermuda.

John Glenn: "If we were going to have success, which we were confident we would, then that would be in such contrast to the Soviets, if we made that open and for the world to see."

And that's This Week At NASA!
 
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