NASA TV's This Week @NASA, Week Ending April 27

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NASA TV's This Week @NASA, Week Ending April 27
04.27.07
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THIS WEEK AT NASA …

IN MEMORIAM - JSC
The Johnson Space Center hosted a memorial service for David Beverly. The 62-year-old senior avionics systems engineer was fatally wounded in a tragic shooting at the center April 20th. His wife of 41 years Linda led a celebration for the passion, diligence and friendship Beverly shared in his 26 years at NASA.

SOT- Center Director Michael Coats - "We are blessed that Dave's passion included NASA and America's space program. We are better for having known him and we are grateful for the time that he shared with us."

Beverly, an avid motorcyclist who owned 17 bikes, also was president of the Johnson Space Center Motorcycle Club. In tribute to their friend and leader, the club members rode in formation to the memorial service.

AIM HIGH - KSC
NASA's Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere, or AIM, spacecraft launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.

SOT- NASA Commentator "Go for drop, Pegasus is away!"

The mission will explore why polar mesospheric clouds, also called "noctilucent," or night shining clouds, form and why they vary. These noctilucent clouds that form in the polar regions are being seen at lower latitudes than ever before, and have recently grown brighter and more frequent, suggesting a connection to global change. The AIM mission is led by Hampton University, the first historically black college and university to have a principle investigator and total responsibility for a NASA satellite mission.

STAR BIRTH - STSci
One of the largest panoramic pictures ever taken with Hubble's Advanced Camera For Surveys shows an area of chaotic star birth. This 50 light-year-wide view of the central region of the Carina Nebula was released by astronomers in celebration of the 17th anniversary of the launch and deployment of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

STEREO - GSFC
NASA's Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory, or STEREO satellites, have made the first three-dimensional pictures of the sun. This will enable scientists to see structures in the sun's atmosphere like never before. The new view will improve their understanding of solar physics and sharpen their forecasting of space weather. Find out how to make or obtain your own 3D glasses with which to see STEREO's 3D solar images at www.nasa.gov/stereo.

FESTIVAL - DFRC
The 16th annual California Poppy Festival in Lancaster featured an exhibit sponsored by the Dryden Flight Research Center. Highlighted was NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, or SOFIA program, as well as the agency's space and exploration efforts. The two-day festival drew more than 50,000 people.

AND THAT’S THIS WEEK AT NASA.
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