How to Observe the Quadrantids Meteor Shower

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How to Observe the Quadrantids Meteor Shower
12.27.07
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The Quadrantids Meteor Shower
Jan. 1-5, 2008

Peak Time (Estimated)
USA: 6 p.m.-2 a.m. PST on Jan. 3 and 4, 2008

Northern Europe: 2 a.m.-10 a.m. (London) on Jan. 4, 2008

Northern Asia: 11 a.m.-7 p.m. (Tokyo) on Jan. 4, 2008

A meteor shower occurs when small pieces of comet dust collide with the Earth's atmosphere.

The Quadrantids get their name because the meteors appear to originate in the abandoned constellation Quadrans Muralis. (Located between Boötes and Draco.)

Video taken with an image-intensified camera during the 2007 Perseids (so named because the meteors appear to be originating the in the constellation Perseus the Hunter) and the Kappa Cygnids, named for Cygnus the Swan.

Video taken with an image-intensified camera during an airborne campaign to view the Leonids (Leo the Lion).

To view the Quadrantids, dress warmly and find a dark area with a clear view of the sky. Use a tree or pole to block the light from the moon.

Look towards the North. While the Quadrantids can be seen anywhere in the sky, they will appear to be coming from the area between Draco, Hercules and Boötes. Estimates call for between 50-130 meteors per hour.

For more information, please visit http://quadrantids.seti.org

Produced by the NASA Ames Video Production Group, Moffett Field, Calif.

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