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David S. Leckrone
 
Senior Project Scientist
Hubble Space Telescope Project
Goddard Space Flight Center, Maryland


A featured guest for the first live broadcast of KSC Direct!, career NASA scientist Dr. David S. Leckrone has worked at the Goddard Space Flight Center since 1969. As a nationally recognized public spokesperson for the upcoming Hubble mission, STS-109, Dr. Leckrone regularly appears on television, in the print media and at public gatherings, discussing the scientific accomplishments and goals of the mission.

Dr. Leckrone has been a part of the Hubble Space Telescope Project since 1976, first as Scientific Instruments Project Scientist, then as Deputy Senior Project Scientist. In 1992 he was appointed Senior Project Scientist for HST. In this capacity he provides scientific leadership for all aspects of the Hubble Project, including management, operations, development of flight instruments and in-orbit servicing. He was the lead Project Scientist at JSC "mission control" during the highly successful Hubble servicing missions in 1993, 1997 and 1999 and continues that role for STS-109.

He holds a B.S. degree in Physics from Purdue University, M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Astronomy from the University of California at Los Angeles, and an M.A.S. degree in Management from the Johns Hopkins University. He is a veteran space astronomer, specializing in the ultraviolet spectroscopy of hot stars and the abundance of the chemical elements. He has been a frequent observer with space instruments, including the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory (OAO-2), the Copernicus Satellite, the International Ultraviolet Explorer and the Hubble Space Telescope.

Dr. Leckrone was awarded NASA's Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal in 1992 and the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal in 1994. In 1996, he received an honorary Doctor of Philosophy degree in Mathematics and Natural Sciences from the University of Lund in Sweden.

 
 
NASA's John F. Kennedy Space Center