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Voyager Media Teleconference
12.03.12
 

Participants:

Arik Posner, Voyager program scientist, NASA Headquarters

Edward Stone, Voyager project scientist, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

Stamatios (Tom) Krimigis, Voyager low-energy charged particle principal investigator, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md.

Leonard Burlaga, Voyager magnetometer team scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.


Stone - 1

Artist's concept shows NASA's two Voyager spacecraft exploring a turbulent region of space known as the heliosheath› Full image and caption

Stone - 2


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› Full image and caption

Stone - 3

Animated graphic showing jumps and dips in charged particles› Full image and caption

Stone - 4

Artist's concept of NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft in solar wind› Full image and caption


Krimigis - 1

This artist's concept shows plasma flows around NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft as it approaches interstellar space.› Full image and caption

Krimigis - 2

This graphic shows the NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft and the location of its low-energy charged particle instrument.› Full image and caption

Krimigis - 3

Measurements of different populations of charged particles by Voyager 1› Full image and caption


Burlaga - 1

This artist's concept shows the different expected directions of the magnetic fields in interstellar space (black lines) and the magnetic field emanating from our sun (white lines).› Full image and caption

Burlaga - 2

This graphic, made from data obtained by NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft, tracks the behavior of the sun's magnetic field and a population of charged particles as the spacecraft moved in and out of a new region scientists are calling the 'magnetic freeway.'› Full image and caption

Burlaga - 3

This graphic shows how the direction of the magnetic field in the region NASA's Voyager 1 is exploring has not changed, even though the intensity of the magnetic field has increased.› Full image and caption