Text Size

Tracking Space Weather Events
08.18.11
 

Multimedia Files in Support of the Tracking Space Weather Events Press Conference


Graphic showing Earth, an erupting Sun and the twin STEREO, ACE and Wind spacecraft at their present locations. › View Larger
Artist's concept of a space weather event, the twin STEREO, ACE and Wind spacecraft. Credit: NASA

Madhulika Guhathakurta, Craig DeForest, David Webb, Alysha Reinard answer questions at Heliophysics press conference on Augus 18, 2011. › View Larger
Tracking space weather panelists (l to r): Madhulika Guhathakurta, Craig DeForest, David Webb and Alysha Reinard. Credit: NASA
NASA's STEREO spacecraft and new data processing techniques have succeeded in tracking space weather events from their origin in the Sun's ultra hot corona to impact with the Earth 93 million miles away, resolving a 40-year mystery about the structure of the structures that cause space weather: how the structures that impact the Earth relate to the corresponding structures in the solar corona.

› Link to Media Advisory
› Link to Press Release
› Link to Associated Media
› Link to Feature Story




Speakers/Presenters

  • Madhulika Guhathakurta, STEREO program scientist, NASA Headquarters
  • Craig DeForest, staff scientist, Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, Colorado
  • David Webb, research physicist, Institute for Scientific Research, Boston College
  • Alysha Reinard, research scientist, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the University of Colorado, Boulder






Visual: 1
The evolving Heliophysics System Observatory missions.
Graphic depicting current and future Heliophysics System Observatory missions in their approximate regions of study. Credit: NASA
› View larger

 

Visual: 2
Visualization of the orbital positions and fields of view of the STEREO spacecraft during the December 2008 CME. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/Scientific Visualization Studio
› Download/Play video

 

Visual: 3
Newly reprocessed images from NASA's STEREO-A spacecraft allow scientists to trace the anatomy of the December 2008 CME as it moves and changes on its journey from the Sun to the Earth, identify the origin and structure of the material that impacted Earth, and connect the image data directly with measurements at Earth at the time of impact. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/SwRI/STEREO
› Download/Play video

 

Visual: 4

To track CMEs from the sun to Earth, STEREO uses five digital cameras, from a telescope pointed straight at the sun to a wide-field camera that sees Earth and Venus more than 45 degrees away. By distorting the many fields-of-view into radial coordinates, STEREO scientists can easily watch the CME's transit in a single video. Credit: NASA/SwRI/STEREO
› Download/Play video

 

Visual: 5
Newly reprocessed images from NASA's STEREO-A spacecraft allow scientists to trace the anatomy of the December 2008 CME as it moves and changes on its journey from the Sun to the Earth, identify the origin and structure of the material that impacted Earth, and connect the image data directly with measurements at Earth at the time of impact. The gauge shows solar wind density measured by NASA's WIND spacecraft near Earth. When the piled up wall passes Earth, the wind gauge, from direct samples by the WIND spacecraft, pegs at 20 atoms per CC, then drops back to near zero. WIND density measurements agree closely with density estimates calculated from the brightness. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/SwRI/STEREO/Wind
› Download/Play video

 

Visual: 6
Simulation created by the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) using the WSA-Enlil model of the solar wind. It shows an August 2011 CME and how it distorts the sun's magnetic field as it moves through it. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/CCMC
› Download/Play video

 

Visual: 7

CMEs can be seen for several hours using this field of view and velocities can be measured. However, this measurement is difficult for CMEs traveling toward the Earth due to the angle of observations and due to energetic particle events that often occur with CMEs. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/Scientific Visualization Studio/SOHO
› Download/Play video

 

Visual: 8
Animation showing how a CME with southward magnetic field lines interacts with the Earth's magnetic field and consequently has a greater effect at the Earth. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/Conceptual Image Lab
› Download animation

 

Visual: 9
Historical perspective of Heliophysics System Observatory (HSO) mission launches.
Graphic showing launch dates of Heliophysics System Observatory missions plotted on a solar cycle timeline. Credit: NASA
› View larger