Feature

Anatomy of a Coronal Mass Ejection: Briefing Materials
04.14.09
 
NASA Science Update to Discuss Anatomy of Solar Storms

WASHINGTON -- NASA will hold a Science Update at 1 p.m. EDT, Tuesday, April 14, to present new findings and three-dimensional views revealing the inner workings of solar storms known as coronal mass ejections. The data will improve the ability to predict how and when these solar tsunamis impact Earth, affecting communication systems, power grids, and other technology. The briefing will take place in the James E. Webb Memorial Auditorium at NASA Headquarters, 300 E St., S.W., and will be carried live on NASA Television.

Reporters may ask questions from participating NASA locations or listen and ask questions by phone. For dial-in information, journalists should send an e-mail to j.d.harrington@nasa.gov listing name, media affiliation, and telephone number. Briefing visuals are listed below. For the complete story, click here.



Media Briefing Presenters


  • Michael Kaiser, project scientist, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO), NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.
  • Angelos Vourlidas, project scientist, Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation, Naval Research Laboratory in Arlington, Va.
  • Antoinette Galvin, principal investigator, Plasma and Suprathermal Ion Composition instrument, University of New Hampshire in Durham
  • Madhulika Guhathakurta, STEREO program scientist, NASA Headquarters



Images and Multimedia in Support of the News Conference



Presenter: Michael Kaiser, project scientist, STEREO, Goddard Spaceflight Center

Visualization showing nearly two weeks of SOHO/EIT and SOHO/LASCO imagery from around Halloween 2003. Animation: Visualization showing nearly two weeks of SOHO/EIT and SOHO/LASCO imagery from around Halloween 2003. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can occasionally be seen launching from the Sun. Credit: Tom Bridgman, NASA
> View animation
> Larger image
> Download broadcast versions
Conceptual animation depicting the STEREO-A spacecraft observing a very active Sun. Animation: Conceptual animation depicting the STEREO-A spacecraft observing a very active Sun. Credit: Walt Feimer, NASA
> View animation
> Larger image
> Download broadcast versions



Presenter: Angelos Vourlidas, Project Scientist, SECCHI instrument Naval Research Laboratory

Visualization of a coronal mass ejection event on December 12-13, 2008 as seen simultaneously by the two STEREO spacecraft Animation: Visualization of a coronal mass ejection event on December 12-13, 2008 as seen simultaneously by the two STEREO spacecraft. The images on the right were taken by STEREO-A, while the images on the left were taken by STEREO-B. The images were taken by the COR2 telescopes on STEREO’s SECCHI instrument suite. Credit: NASA
> View animation
> Larger image
> Download broadcast versions
Conceptual animation and data visualization showing the STEREO-A spacecraft imaging the December 12-13 coronal mass ejection Animation: Conceptual animation and data visualization showing the STEREO-A spacecraft imaging the December 12-13 coronal mass ejection event using the COR2 and HI1 telescopes on its SECCHI instrument suite. Credit: Walt Feimer, NASA
> View animation
> Larger image
> Download broadcast versions
Conceptual animation and data visualization showing the two simultaneous sets of images from STEREO-A and STEREO-B Animation: Conceptual animation and data visualization showing how the two simultaneous sets of images from the STEREO-A and STEREO-B spacecraft are used to determine the three-dimensional shape of a coronal mass ejection. Credit: Walt Feimer, NASA
> View animation
> Larger image
> Download broadcast versions



Presenter: Antoinette Galvin, Principal Investigator, PLASTIC instrument, University of New Hampshire

Visualization showing December 12-13 coronal mass ejection as seen by the COR2 and HI1 telescopes of STEREO. Animation: Visualization showing the December 12-13 coronal mass ejection as seen by the COR2 and HI1 telescopes of STEREO-A. As the CME moves away from the Sun, it becomes more difficult to see using remote sensing instruments. Credit: NASA
> View animation
> Larger image
> Download broadcast versions



Presenter: Madhulika Guhathakurta, STEREO Program Scientist, NASA Headquarters

This presenter requires no supplemental media.



Related Links


> STEREO Reveals the Anatomy of a Solar Storm in 3D (Feature Story)
> NASA TV
> STEREO Mission site