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ISS Update: Interviews (Nov. 19-23, 2012)
 
Interviews: International Space Station Update

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ISS Update: Packing and Preparing Space Food (Part 2) - 11.21.12
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Public Affairs Officer Amiko Kauderer talks with NASA Food Scientist Vickie Kloeris at Johnson Space Center's Space Food Laboratory. They are inside the Packaging Room that filters out contaminants and packages food for the astronauts. Beverages, freeze-dried food and snacks such as cookies and M&Ms are packaged here.

Beverages are powdered and sealed in a package. Water is then injected into the package which is then shaken and sipped from a straw. Rehydratable food is also injected with water and absorbed. The package is then cut open and an astronaut then eats out of it with a spoon.

Products are produced year round and inventoried. Beverages and rehydratable foods are prepared a few months before a space station mission. Foods are packaged in metal containers or plastic packages depending on the numerous resupply vehicles that are delivering them.

Kloeris also answers questions about preparing food for space missions submitted by Twitter users.



ISS Update: Packing and Preparing Space Food (Part 1) - 11.21.12
› Watch video

Public Affairs Officer Amiko Kauderer talks with NASA Food Scientist Vickie Kloeris at Johnson Space Center's Space Food Laboratory. They talk about preparing a Thanksgiving dinner for the residents of International Space Station.

Kloeris began her career in the Shuttle Food Systems program and transitioned to the International Space Station Food Systems program. She and several other food scientists are also researching future food needs for astronauts for the Adavanced Food Techonology program.

There is no food refrigeration onboard the station and food is stored at room temperature. However, beverages can be chilled helping astronauts cool off after exercising.

The needs of shuttle crew members differed from those of station crew members. A typical shuttle mission lasted about two weeks. However, a station mission lasts up to six and months and crews were desiring better, more appetizing food. So NASA created over 200 types of food and beverages for station crew members to boost their morale during long duration missions.

Kloeris also answers questions about preparing food for space missions submitted by Twitter users.

Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson and include the hashtag #askStation.