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Space Station Live: Interviews (April 8-12, 2013)
 
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Space Station Live: Astronaut Photos Highlight Earth Month – 04.12.13
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Melissa Dawson, an Earth scientist with NASA’s Johnson Space Center, recently spoke by phone with Public Affairs Officer Nicole Cloutier-Lemasters to discuss the importance of astronaut photography of Earth from space.

Beginning with the Mercury missions in the early 1960s, astronauts have taken photographs of the Earth. The Crew Earth Observation team collects the locations and supporting data for these images and makes them available on their website, the Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. These images include more than a million photos taken from the International Space Station.

› Visit the Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth

All month long in celebration of Earth Day coming up on April 22, the Crew Earth Observation team is highlighting some of the best photos taken by the Expedition 35 crew currently aboard the station. The team is also sharing some earlier photos and videos that demonstrate the importance of the station as a remote sensing platform for collecting striking imagery of our planet.

› Visit the Crew Earth Observation team’s Earth Day page

Watch the full Space Station Live broadcast weekdays on NASA TV at 10 a.m. CDT.

For more information on science and operations aboard the station, visit http://www.nasa.gov/station.



Space Station Live: Station Communications Upgrade – 04.12.13
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NASA Public Affairs Officer Nicole Cloutier-Lemasters recently spoke with Penny Roberts, one of the leads for the International Space Station Avionics and Software group, about the upgrade of the Ku-band communications gear aboard the station.

Over the past few weeks the Expedition 35 crew has been involved in installing the new High Rate Communications System hardware, which adds two additional video downlink channels from the station and doubles the number of space-to-ground audio channels.

The additional bandwidth is a welcome new resource for scientists and researchers eager to retrieve data from their experiments aboard the station. As Roberts pointed out, “We’re positive that the bandwidth will be filled, and is already filled, by the payloads needing to get data to the ground.”

Watch the full Space Station Live broadcast weekdays on NASA TV at 10 a.m. CDT.

For more information on science and operations aboard the station, visit http://www.nasa.gov/station.



Space Station Live: Veteran Astronaut Talks Crew Orientation – 04.11.13
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NASA Public Affairs Officer Nicole Cloutier-Lemasters recently spoke with NASA astronaut Cady Coleman, who lived aboard the International Space Station as Expedition 26/27 crew member from December 2010 to May 2011.

Coleman described some of the day-to-day chores aboard the orbiting complex. She also discussed the crew orientation activities of Flight Engineer Chris Cassidy as he learns the ropes of his new orbital home. Cassidy, along with Flight Engineers Pavel Vinogradov and Alexander Misurkin, arrived at the station on March 28 aboard a Soyuz spacecraft.

While the crew focuses as much time as possible on supporting important scientific research during the week, the weekend is the time for some light-duty housekeeping chores like vacuuming vents to ensure proper air flow through the station. “It’s really actually kind of fun, too,” remarked Coleman, “because we get to fly everywhere up there.”

Joked Coleman, “If I got to fly around the house vacuuming, I think I would do it a lot more often.”



Space Station Live: EarthKAM Recreating View From Gemini – 04.11.13
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Ken Ramsley, a graduate student in the Planetary Geosciences group at Brown University in Providence, R.I., joined NASA Public Affairs Officer Nicole Cloutier-Lemasters by phone to discuss his work with EarthKAM in recreating a Gemini astronaut’s memorable view.

EarthKAM is a NASA education program that enables students to photograph and examine Earth with a special digital camera mounted onboard the International Space Station.

After the recovery from a dangerously stuck thruster on the Gemini 8 spacecraft in 1966 and prior to its landing, astronaut David Scott was awestruck by the view from the spacecraft’s window as the vehicle soared over Asia and the Himalayas.

Years later, when the opportunity to use EarthKAM arose, Scott, who is now a visiting professor at Brown, suggested recapturing those views of Gemini’s final pass over the Himalayas that he found so memorable.

Working with archived Gemini data from NASA, Ramsley selected eight target opportunities along Gemini’s final orbital track and submitted them to EarthKAM. To date, two of the images have been acquired and Ramsley is working to gather the remaining images.

Teachers and students who are interested in controlling EarthKAM on the station are encouraged to visit the EarthKAM website to learn more about this program.

› Visit EarthKAM website


Watch the full Space Station Live broadcast weekdays on NASA TV at 10 a.m. CDT.

For more information on science and operations aboard the station, visit http://www.nasa.gov/station.



Space Station Live: EarthKAM with Kelly McCormick – 04.09.13
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NASA Public Affairs Officer Nicole Cloutier-Lemasters interviews Teaching in Space Project Coordinator Kelly McCormick about Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle school students, or EarthKAM.

EarthKAM is a NASA education program that enables thousands of students to photograph and examine Earth from a space crew's perspective. Using the Internet, the students control a special digital camera mounted aboard the International Space Station. This enables them to photograph the Earth's coastlines, mountain ranges and other geographic items of interest from the unique vantage point of space. The team at EarthKAM then posts these photographs on the Internet for the public and participating classrooms around the world to view.

EarthKAM was initiated by Dr. Sally Ride, America's first woman in space, in 1995 as KidSat. After flight as a camera payload aboard several space shuttle missions, the program was renamed ISS EarthKAM. The camera system was placed aboard the space station as a permanent science education payload during Expedition 1 in 2001.

The ISS EarthKAM Mission Operations Center, located at the University of California, San Diego, is modeled after NASA's Mission Control Center at the Johnson Space Center, and staffed by undergraduate students to support four missions annually.

To learn more about EarthKAM and the next opportunity to take part in its mission visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/news/earthkam_news.html
https://earthkam.ucsd.edu/
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/90.html

Watch the full Space Station Live broadcast weekdays on NASA TV at 10 a.m. CDT.

For more information on science and operations aboard the station, visit http://www.nasa.gov/station.