Feature

Text Size

Lead Increment Scientist's Highlights For The Week of Oct. 15, 2012
10.31.12
 
This Crew Earth Observation image shows Wake Island, located in the central Pacific Ocean approximately 4000 kilometers to the west-southwest of Hawaii and 2400 kilometers to the northwest of Guam. (NASA) This Crew Earth Observation image shows Wake Island, located in the central Pacific Ocean approximately 4000 kilometers to the west-southwest of Hawaii and 2400 kilometers to the northwest of Guam. (NASA)
View large image

This ISAAC image, taken on Oct. 14, shows the flooding in Nigeria. (NASA) This ISAAC image, taken on Oct. 14, shows the flooding in Nigeria. (NASA)
View large image
(Highlights: week of Oct. 15, 2012) -- Three convective flow test points were successfully performed using 100% decane fuel for the Flame Extinguishment Experiment -2 (FLEX-2). FLEX-2 encompasses five distinct investigation classes using pure and bi-component mixed fuels. The results from these test points will lead to greater fuel efficiency of liquid-fuel engines and will minimize pollutant emissions. On Earth, FLEX-2 will help in the understanding of combustion generated pollution, and address fire hazards associated with using liquid combustibles.

More sampling was completed in the Japanese Experiment Module, or Kibo, for the Microbial Dynamics in the International Space Station - III (Microbe-III) investigation. Microbe-III monitors the abundance and diversity of fungi and bacteria in Kibo, which may affect the health of crew members. The study uses new sampling techniques and environmental microbiological methods for environmental analysis. The results will be used to produce a microbiologically safe environment which is essential for a long-term stay in space.

Through Oct. 16, Crew Earth Observations investigation (CEO) has returned 4,323 images to the ground for reviewing and cataloging. Recent images include Lilongwe, Malawi; Buenos Aires, Argentina; Caracas, Venezuela; Manila, Philippines; and Antananarivo, Madagascar. For this investigation, station crew members photograph natural and human-made changes on Earth. These images provide researchers with key data to better understand the planet.

The International Space Station Agricultural Camera (ISSAC) ISSAC is currently capturing secondary science imagery. The camera captured 21 targets from Oct. 11-18, of which nine were international disaster targets. ISSAC is being used to study dynamic Earth processes around the world, such as melting glaciers, ecosystem responses to seasonal changes, and human impacts including rapid-response monitoring of natural disasters. It takes frequent images, in visible and infrared light, principally of vegetated areas -- growing crops, grasslands and forests.

Other human research investigations continued for various crew members including ALTEA-Shield, Circadian Rhythms, Energy, Treadmill Kinematics, and Reaction Self Test.

Vic Cooley, Lead Increment Scientist
Expedition 33/34


› View All Science Updates