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Lead Increment Scientist's Highlights For The Week of Jan. 21, 2013
02.01.13
 
Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield holds bubble detectors for the RaDI-N 2 investigation in the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory. This investigation measures neutron radiation levels onboard the space station. It uses bubble detectors as neutron monitors which have been designed to only detect neutrons and ignore all other radiation. (NASA) Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield holds bubble detectors for the RaDI-N 2 investigation in the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory. This investigation measures neutron radiation levels onboard the space station. It uses bubble detectors as neutron monitors which have been designed to only detect neutrons and ignore all other radiation. (NASA)
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(Highlights: week of Jan. 21, 2013) -- NASA astronauts Kevin Ford, Expedition 34 commander, and Thomas Marshburn assessed the operational readiness of the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) for upcoming plant investigations onboard the International Space Station. The ABRS is a single locker system with two growth chambers. Each chamber is a closed system capable of independently controlling temperature, illumination and atmospheric composition to grow a variety of biological organisms.

Ford performed the final Capillary Flow Experiment-2 (CFE-2) fluid test run with the vane gap-2 hardware. This suite of fluid physics experiments investigates how fluids move up surfaces in microgravity. The results aim to improve current computer models used by designers of low-gravity fluid systems and may improve fluid transfer systems for water on future spacecraft.

Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield concluded the second of four RaDI-N 2 Neutron Field Study (RaDI-N 2) sessions. This investigation measures neutron radiation levels onboard the space station. It uses bubble detectors as neutron monitors which have been designed to only detect neutrons and ignore all other radiation. In collaboration with a Russian cosmonaut, eight bubble detectors were retrieved from their deployed locations. Hadfield inserted two of the detectors into the bubble-dosimeter reader to generate a table of results. The Russian crew member processed the remaining six detectors. RaDI-N 2 is a follow-on investigation designed to characterize the neutron radiation environment onboard the space station. The objective of this investigation is to better characterize the station neutron environment and define the risk posed to the crew members' health and provide the data necessary to develop advanced protective measures for future spaceflight.

The Robotics Refueling Mission, or RRM, operations team completed the refueling task. The investigation demonstrates and tests the tools, technologies and techniques needed to robotically service and refuel satellites in space, especially satellites not originally designed to be serviced. Findings from the mission are expected to reduce risks and lay the foundation for future robotic servicing missions in microgravity.

Other human research investigations continued for various crew members including Spinal Ultrasound, Integrated Cardiovascular, Circadian Rhythms, Repository, and Dietary Intake Can Predict and Protect Against Changes in Bone Metabolism During Spaceflight and Recovery, or Pro K.

Vic Cooley, Lead Increment Scientist
Expedition 33/34


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