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Lead Increment Scientist's Highlights For the Final Week of September 2012
10.05.12
 
This Crew Earth Observation image of the Pyramids of Giza, Egypt, provides a view of these monuments and their modern day setting. The southeast-facing sides of the pyramids of the pharaohs Khufu, Khafre and Menkaure are all brightly illuminated by the sun, while the northwest facing sides are in shadow. This shadowing highlights smaller unfinished pyramids to the south of Menkaure's pyramid, as well as fields of rectangular flat roofed mastabas, or tombs, to the east and west of Khufu's pyramid. Mastabas were the burial places of prominent persons during the periods of the ancient pharaohs. To the southeast of Khufu's pyramid, the head and rear haunches of the Sphinx are also visible. (NASA) This Crew Earth Observation image of the Pyramids of Giza, Egypt, provides a view of these monuments and their modern day setting. The southeast-facing sides of the pyramids of the pharaohs Khufu, Khafre and Menkaure are all brightly illuminated by the sun, while the northwest facing sides are in shadow. This shadowing highlights smaller unfinished pyramids to the south of Menkaure's pyramid, as well as fields of rectangular flat roofed mastabas, or tombs, to the east and west of Khufu's pyramid. Mastabas were the burial places of prominent persons during the periods of the ancient pharaohs. To the southeast of Khufu's pyramid, the head and rear haunches of the Sphinx are also visible. (NASA)
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(Highlights: final week of Sept. 2012) -- Data transmitted from the technology demonstration called the Reentry Breakup Recorder (REBR), looks good. The REBR rode on the Japanese cargo vehicle, HTV-3, recording data as it reentered the Earth's atmosphere. Investigators are processing and analyzing this data to characterize the environment experienced aboard HTV-3 and after release of REBR as it fell into the South Pacific Ocean. Understanding how vehicles behave during atmospheric reentry gives future spacecraft developers unique information that can enhance design efficiencies and safety.

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's JEM Small Satellite Orbital Deployer ( J-SSOD), deployed five student-designed small satellites. Two of the satellites have already made contact with the ground. JAXA provides the new device, which is capable of launching small satellites from the JEM Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS).

Checkouts continue for the Space Communications and Navigation Testbed (SCAN Testbed). SCAN Testbed consists of reconfigurable software-defined radios with software-based communications and navigation functions that allow mission planners to change the functionality of the radio once on-orbit. The ability to change the operating characteristics of the radio's software after launch offers the flexibility to adapt to new science opportunities and increased data return.

Through Sept. 24, Crew Earth Observations investigation (CEO) has returned 1,292 images to the ground for reviewing and cataloging. Recent images include Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; the Mississippi River Delta; and fires in Ecuador. For this investigation, station crew members photograph natural and human-made changes on Earth. These images provide researchers with key data to better understand the planet.

The Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HREP-HICO) Experiment Payload has taken 6,510 images to date, including recent images of the Sea of Azov, part of South Africa, Lake Erie and the panhandle of Florida. The experiment analyzes the water clarity, chlorophyll content, water depth and ocean or sea floor composition for naval purposes.

Other human research investigations continued for various crew members including, ALTEA-Shield, Nutrition, VO2max, Thermolab, Integrated Cardiovascular, and Reaction Self Test.

Vic Cooley, Lead Increment Scientist
Expedition 33/34


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