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Supervision of Autonomous and Teleoperated Satellites - Interact (SATS-Interact)
12.05.12

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Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery

Experiment Overview

This content was provided by Vadim Slavin, Randy Stiles, and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.

Brief Summary

Supervision of Autonomous and Teleoperated Satellites (SATS) is a research effort aimed at drastically improving remote operation of space assets by enabling one user to control multiple maneuvering satellites. SATS effort is developing Interact, a command and control user interface, which enables one user to supervise the tasking and monitor the activity of a team of remote nanosatellites working on a common mission.

Principal Investigator(s)

  • Vadim Slavin, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Sunnyvale, CA, United States
  • Randy Stiles, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Sunnyvale, CA, United States
  • Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)

    Information Pending

    Developer(s)

    Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Sunnyvale, CA, United States

    Sponsoring Space Agency

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

    Sponsoring Organization

    National Laboratory (NL)

    ISS Expedition Duration:

    September 2011 - March 2014



    Expeditions Assigned

    29/30,35/36,37/38

    Previous ISS Missions

    All prior experiments utilizing the SPHERES tesbed are related to SATS - Interact experiments. The operational instructions for SATS - Interact should be familiar to crew members who already performed experiments on the SPHERES testbed.

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    Experiment Description

    Research Overview

    • Simultaneous teleoperation of multiple remote space assets is currently a laborious task undertaken by multiple skilled operators who directly translate their actions to commanding remote space assets. This process alternates between periods of direct teleoperation and assessment of its results and progress to mission objective. This process is not efficient and requires substantial effort on the part of human operators resulting in loss of productivity and risk to valuable space resources.


    • Supervision of Autonomous and Teleoperated Satellites (SATS) is a research effort aimed at reducing the complexity of teleoperation of multiple space assets. SATS will develop a user interface and control methodology, called Interact, which will be applied to commanding multiple space resident nanosatellites from the ground overcoming the inefficiencies of direct remote manipulation which is also burdened bu communication delays and blackouts.


    • Efficient visualization of telemetry and innovative command and control interface will simplify teleoperation and enable a continuous dialog between human and artificial team members (space assets) working on a common mission. This will reduce the complexity of current missions relying on remote supervision and coordination of space assets and enable more complex missions supported by capable robotic agents working in teams on a common task under supervision of a just a few human users.

    Description

    Supervision of Autonomous and Teleoperated Satellites (SATS) is a research effort aimed at drastically improving remote operation of space assets by enabling one user to control multiple maneuvering satellites. SATS effort is developing Interact, a command and control user interface, which enables one user to supervise the tasking and monitor the activity of a team of remote nanosatellites working on a common mission.

    Simultaneous teleoperation of multiple remote space assets is currently a laborious task undertaken by multiple skilled operators who directly translate their actions to commanding remote space assets. This process alternates between periods of direct teleoperation and assessment of its results and progress to mission objectives. This process is not efficient and requires substantial effort on the part of human operators resulting in loss of productivity and risk to valuable space resources.

    SATS applies data and information visualization techniques inside an immersive environment to fuse data and telemetry coming from multiple remote sensors to drastically improve situational awareness of the human operators and increase information absorption towards more efficient decision-making . The interaction between human and robotic team members is implemented as a spatial dialog where multimodal interaction techniques are used to convey tasking intent to implement human-in-the-loop and human-on-the-loop command and control frameworks.

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    Applications

    Space Applications

    Supervision of Autonomous and Teleoperated Satellites (SATS) research acitivity and specifically Interact software presents a more efficient way to interact with space assets supervising them to perform satellite servicing, spacecraft assembly and emergency repairs. SATS research aims to simplify and improve these activities.

    Earth Applications

    The research performed under the Supervision of Autonomous and Teleoperated Satellites (SATS) activity applies to a broad range of remote autonomous robotic agents. Among those are remote underwater vehicles as well as remote ground vehicles operating in hazardous conditions. SATS research can be extended to implement similar command and control interfaces to these platforms and thus enable improved supervision of these resources. This will have an impact on the quality and effectiveness of utilization of such remote resources working to benefit life here on Earth.

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    Operations

    Operational Requirements

    • 6 SPHERES Test Sessions with 3 satellites


    • Sessions 1, 2, 3: On-board interaction -


    • Session 1: Check out new GUI upgrades


    • Session 1 to Session 2: 2 to 3 weeks later


    • Session 2 to Session 3: 6 to 8 weeks later


    • Sessions 4, 5, 6: real-time ISS-ground command and data handling


    • Session 4: Check out new real-time C&DH capability


    • Session 4 to Session 5: 2 to 3 weeks later


    • Session 5 to Session 5: 4 to 8 weeks later


    • Usage of regular consumables (CO2 & Batteries) during test sessions


    • SPHERES GUI Upgrades


    • GUI Executable Upgrades


    • One time for "on-board interaction"


    • One time for "real-time C&DH"


    • Matlab installed for use aboard ISS


    • SPHERES Program File (SPF) < 1MB (standard SPHERES procedures)
    • Downlink:


    • Video of the tests (2 Camera vies, as per standard SPHERES procedures)


    • SPHERES Data & Log Files (SDF, SGF, SLF) (standard SPHERES procedures)

    Operational Protocols

    Interact will follow the standard SPHERES procedures with the following differences:
    On-board interactions

  • 1.001 Setup: no changes


  • 2.001 Run Tests:


  • Will follow the standard procedures; in the "Test Overview" the crew will be instructed to interact more with the satellite and observe the animation tools on the screen. These tests will be designed to follow all the standard SPHERES procedures.


  • The crew "interactions" will use keyboard "run-time" commands, which have been exercised by the SPHERES team in the past, therefore no new procedures or crew actions will need to take place.


  • 2.002 Consumables: no changes


  • 2.003 Shutdown: no changes


  • "Real-time command and control"


  • 1.001 Setup:


  • May need a step to confirm real-time data availability


  • 2.001 Run Tests:


  • Follow standard procedures; once a test is started the crew will "observe" the satellites as they do for "autonomous" tests, except in this case the satellites will move based on real-time commands from the ground. As with autonomous tests, the crew will have the ability to stop the test at any time.


  • 2.002 Consumables: no changes


  • 2.003 Shutdown: no changes
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    Results/More Information

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    Related Websites

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    Imagery

    Information provided by the investigation team to the ISS Program Scientist's Office.
    If updates are needed to the summary please contact JSC-ISS-Program-Science-Group. For other general questions regarding space station research and technology, please feel free to call our help line at 281-244-6187 or e-mail at JSC-ISS-Payloads-Helpline.