JEM Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (J-SSOD) - 07.29.14

Summary | Overview | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery
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The JEM Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (J-SSOD) provides a novel, safe, small satellite launching capability to the International Space Station (ISS). The J-SSOD is a unique satellite launcher, handled by the Japanese Experiment Module Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS), which provides containment and deployment mechanisms for several individual small satellites. The J-SSOD platform, including the satellite install cases holding the small satellites, is transferred by crewmembers into the vacuum of space through the JEM airlock for JEMRMS retrieval, positioning and deployment.

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Information Pending



This content was provided by Shinobu Doi, and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.

Facility Details

OpNom:

Facility Manager(s)

  • Shinobu Doi, Tsukuba, Japan

  • Facility Representative(s)
    Information Pending
    Developer(s)

    Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Tsukuba, , Japan

    Sponsoring Space Agency
    Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)

    Sponsoring Organization
    Technology Demonstration Office (TDO)

    ISS Expedition Duration
    September 2012 - October 2015

    Expeditions Assigned
    33/34,35/36,37/38,43/44

    Previous ISS Missions
    Information Pending

    Availability
    Information Pending

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    Facility Description

    Facility Overview

    • J-SSOD facility provides a reliable, safe and economically viable means of deploying research small satellites into Earth orbit. Atmospheric and surface monitoring, radio communications testing, and small object and sample return to the ground for testing and analysis are all potential candidates for this facility.


    • The J-SSOD facility provides a unique satellite install case to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Remote Manipulator System (RMS) for deploying small, CubeSat, satellites from the ISS.


    • J-SSOD holds up to 3 small one-unit (1U ? 10 x 10 x 10 cm) small CubeSats per satellite install case, 6 in total, though other sizes up to 55 x 55 x 35 cm size may also be used..


    • Each pre-packed satellite install case is loaded by crewmembers onto the Multi-Purpose Experiment Platform (MPEP) within the JEM habitable volume. The MPEP platform is then attached to the JEM Slide Table inside the JEM airlock for transfer to the JEMRMS and space environment.


    • The JEMRMS grapples and maneuvers the MPEP and J-SSOD to a predefined deployment orientation and then jettisons the small CubeSat satellites.


    • Small satellites deployed using the J-SSOD as an ISS facility could perform a multitude of scientific investigations relating to Earth, including atmospheric, radio communications and earth observations to name but a few.
    The J-SSOD facility is the first of its kind to deploy small satellites from an orbiting space station, the ISS. J-SSOD provides a reliable, safe and economically viable means of deploying small research satellites into Earth?s atmosphere or return small objects and samples to the ground for testing and analysis. This facility supports research from multiple users and future CubeSat investigators

    The Multi-Purpose Experiment Platform (MPEP) is a platform that acts as an interface between operations inside and outside the ISS, and the J-SSOD mechanism is installed on this platform. Two rectangular, spring loaded satellite cases accommodate up to 3 small 1U (10 cubic cm) cube satellites each. Brackets on the satellite install case base provide attachment points for the MPEP which attaches to the JEM Slide Table for passage through the JEM airlock. Individually launched, pre-packed satellite install cases are installed in J-SSOD by crewmembers, attached to the Multi-Purpose Experiment Platform (MPEP) and passed through the JEM airlock for retrieval by the JEMRS. A JEMRMS grapple fixture supports capture, orientation and deployment operations, including communications and power interfaces.

    The Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and other ISS cameras may be used to support video monitoring of satellite deployment as necessary. Deployment of small satellites requires a specific JEMRMS orientation (i.e., safe deployment cone) in order to avoid ISS contact.

    Expedition 33 saw the first use of the JSSOD facility with the successful deployment of 5 small CubeSat investigations: RAIKO, FITSAT-1, WE WISH, NanoRacks CubeSat-1/F-1 and TechEdSat.
      Satellite name: RAIKO,
      Size: 2U
      Objectives:

        - Image the Earth using a fish-eye lens camera
        - Photographically measure satellite movement relative to JEM using a Panoramic Color Camera (PCC)
        - Star sensor testing
        - A de-orbit experiment testing a deployable membrane mechanism
        - Testing a small mobile ground station for receiving signals via international cooperation
        - An orbit determination experiment using Ku-band radio frequency Doppler measurements
        - A high-speed Ku-band data communication experiment

      Satellite name: FITSAT-1
      Size: 1U
      Objectives:

        - Technical demonstration of a high-speed small satellite transmitter module to send VGA resolution JPEG images in 5-6 seconds
        - Conducting an "artificial star" optical communications test utilizing high output visible light LEDs
        - FITSAT-1 (NIWAKA)
        - FIT

      Satellite name: WE WISH
      Size: 1U
      Objectives:

        - To promote technology education and the utilization of small satellite data
        - To test an ultra-small thermal infrared camera for ground temperature observations

      Satellite name: TechEdSat
      Size: 1U
      Objectives:

        - Demonstrate Swedish designed Space Plug-and-Play Avionics (SPA) hardware and software
        - TechEdSat

      Satellite name: NanoRacks CubeSat-1/F-1
      Size: 1U
      Objectives:

        - To test a series of amateur radio transceivers employing a magnetometer and temperature sensors, and a camera
        - F-1 picosatellite project - FSpace laboratory

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        Operations

        Facility Operations

        • Once the satellite install cases with pre-packed small satellites, CubeSats, have been received onboard, crewmembers unpack and install them onto Multi-Purpose Experiment Platform (MPEP), which is already installed onto JEM AL Slide Table, along with other equipment related to the J-SSOD mechanism.


        • After J-SSOD installation is complete, the crew commands the JEM AL to extend J-SSOD outside for retrieval.


        • Then, ground operators, controlling the JEMRMS, retrieve the J-SSOD from the JEM Slide Table, and maneuver the JEMRMS to the appropriate deployment orientation.


        • Small satellites are commanded to deploy and subsequently monitored by their respective investigation teams.


        • J-SSOD is returned to the airlock and stowed inside the ISS JEM module.

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        Results/More Information

        Results Publications

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        Ground Based Results Publications

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        ISS Patents

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        Related Publications

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        Related Websites

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        Imagery

        image Preflight front view of the J-SSOD mechanism, highlighting the 2 CubeSat carrier/deployment canisters (JAXA).
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        image NASA Image: ISS033E009286: TechEdSat, NanoRacks CubeSat-1/F-1 and FITSAT-1 (left to right) drifting past the ISS solar arrays - Expedition 33.
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        image Preflight side view of J-SSOD mechanism, showing JEMRMS grapple fixture (JAXA).
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        image Preflight side view of the 2 CubeSat carrier/deployment canisters (JAXA).
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        image NASA Image: ISS033E006452 - Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide works with the Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (SSOD) installed on the Multi-Purpose Experiment Platform (MPEP) of the extended slide table of the Kibo airlock.
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        image NASA Image: ISS033E006413: FITSAT-1, NanoRacks CubeSat-1/F-1 and TechEdSat shown loaded in J-SSOD (from left to right) prior to deployment during Expedition 33.
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        image NASA Image: ISS033E006412: CubeSat investigations RAIKO and WE WISH shown loaded in J-SSOD (from left to right) prior to deployment during Expedition 33.
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        image NASA Image: ISS033E006416: JEM Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (J-SSOD) attached to the JEM Airlock Slide Table ? Expedition 33.
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        image NASA Image: ISS033E009865: JEM Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (J-SSOD) riding the JEM Airlock Slide Table through the outer airlock hatch prior to JEM RMS (Remote Manipulator System) grapple ? Expedition 33.
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        image NASA Image: ISS033E009265: JEM Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (J-SSOD) being removed from the JEM Airlock Slide Table by the JEM RMS (Remote Manipulator System) ? Expedition 33.
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        image NASA Image ISS033E009352: Close up view of JEM Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (J-SSOD) in position to deploy first CubeSat investigations from ISS ? Expedition 33.
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        image NASA Image: ISS033E009309: JEM Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (J-SSOD) deploying first 2 CubeSat investigations from ISS - WE WISH and RAIKO ? Expedition 33.
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