ELaboratore Immagini TElevisive - Space 2 (ELITE-S2) - 10.14.14

Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery
ISS Science for Everyone

Science Objectives for Everyone
ELaboratore Immagini TElevisive - Space 2 (ELITE-S2) investigates the connection between brain, visualization and motion in the absence of gravity. By recording and analyzing the three-dimensional motion of crewmembers, this study helps engineers apply ergonomics into future spacecraft designs and determines the effects of weightlessness on breathing mechanisms for long-duration missions. This experiment is a cooperative effort with the Italian Space Agency, ASI.

Science Results for Everyone
Information Pending



The following content was provided by Francesco Lacquaniti, M.D., and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.

Experiment Details

OpNom

Principal Investigator(s)

  • Francesco Lacquaniti, M.D., University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy

  • Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)
  • Fondazione Santa Lucia, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
  • Giancarlo Ferrigno, Ph.D., Politecnico di Milano, Milano, Italy
  • Myrka Zago, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy

  • Developer(s)
    Italian Space Agency (ASI), Rome, , Italy

    Kayser Italia Srl., Livorno, , Italy

    Sponsoring Space Agency
    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

    Sponsoring Organization
    Italian Space Agency (ASI)

    Research Benefits
    Information Pending

    ISS Expedition Duration
    October 2007 - March 2013

    Expeditions Assigned
    16,17,31/32,33/34

    Previous ISS Missions
    The predecessor to this investigation, ELITE-S, was flown on EUROMIR in 1995. A similar experiment, KINELITE, flew on STS-90.

    ^ back to top



    Experiment Description

    Research Overview

    • On Earth, the ability to catch a ball depends on a mental model of the physical behavior of that object, a model that includes gravity. In a microgravity environment, crewmembers adjust their motor control strategies to respond to new rules, but still show evidence that the old gravity-based rules are hard-wired into their brains through neural networks.


    • This experiment evaluates differences in the way the brain controls conscious and unconscious motions such as breathing, sitting and standing in environments with and without gravity.

    Description

    Several experiments done on orbit have demonstrated that similar neural and cognitive mechanisms participate during both imagining and executing a movement. A previous Neurolab study showed that crewmembers used an internal model of gravity, even in microgravity, to initiate the movements of catching a dropped ball. This demonstrated that gravity representation is built into the neural networks involved in planning interceptive movements. More recently, it has been uncovered that activity in the vestibular cortex represents the neural substrate of the internal model of Newton's law in the Earth's gravitational field. However, mental imagery of the laws of motion of objects has not been studied in space to date.

    ELITE-S2 provides a system for observations on body motor control during long term exposure to microgravity and performs quantitative data collection and analysis on board the International Space Station (ISS). The primary goal of ELITE-S2 is to study the strategies for dynamic control of posture and body motion and adaptive mechanisms which allow adjustment of motor control strategies resulting from exposure to microgravity. ELITE-S2 investigates whether gravity representation also affects mental imagery of an interceptive task in microgravity. In addition, it investigates the effects of weightlessness on breathing mechanisms.


    To better understand the neural mechanism for motor control in microgravity, ELITE-S2 analyzes movement of crewmembers from sitting to standing while monitoring the quantitative postural response to optokinetic stimulation (visual tracking of motion). The role of sensory inputs in the organization of the locomotion patterns and the role of sensorimotor integration mechanisms are evaluated during pointing and reaching tasks. Cardiorespiratory physiology is examined by quantitatively analyzing the chest wall compartment mechanics. To aid in ergonomic design and human factors for future spacecraft design, this investigation also evaluates working posture.

    Understanding the ability of the human brain to mentally represent the presence or absence of gravity is key to training crewmembers to complete tasks in a low gravity environment. Ergonomics findings from this study can be used in the design of future spacecraft and space-qualified systems.

    Two experiment protocols have been defined for ELITE-S2:

    • Imagery of object Motion Affected by Gravity in null gravity Experiments for ELITE-S2 (IMAGINE-2): On Earth our ability to catch a ball depends on a mental model of the physical behavior of that object, a model that includes gravity. In a microgravity environment, crewmembers adjust their motor control strategies to respond to new rules, but still show evidence that the old gravity based rules are hard wired into their brains through neural networks.


    • Movement in Orbit Vehicle Experiments (MOVE): This experiment evaluates differences in the way the brain controls conscious and unconscious motions such as bending trunk, pointing and reaching objects in environments with and without gravity.

    ^ back to top



    Applications

    Space Applications

    This study allows for the application of ergonomics in the design of future spacecraft and determines the effects of microgravity on breathing mechanisms for long-duration missions.

    Earth Applications

    This study has important implications not only for understanding basic mechanisms of motor control, but also for rehabilitative training of neurological patients with impaired motor control. New rehabilitation techniques are based on virtual reality and mental rehearsal of motor actions.

    ^ back to top



    Operations

    Operational Requirements

    The hardware for the experiment (the Interface Management Unit) is installed in an EXPRESS Rack and the cameras and body restraints must be mounted in specific areas. A total of three sessions of ELITE-S2 with three crewmembers participating in each session are required. The first session is immediately following vehicle docking to ISS, the second session one month after docking and the third session shortly before the crewmembers return to Earth. The data captured by the cameras in each session is downlinked for analysis by ground teams. The ground teams study the mental representations of gravity and microgravity as well as the adaptive mechanisms of motor control to microgravity.

    Operational Protocols

    For each protocol, a set of body landmarks are identified and reflective markers are applied on the crewmember performing the experiment. The crewmember performs prescheduled movements (for example, the subject has to reach and brush, without exerting forces) with his index finger tips then return to the initial position. Video cameras trace the trajectories of the body parts of the crewmember catching the light reflected by the markers. This allows the cameras to record the kinetic and trajectory data of the movement.

    ^ back to top



    Results/More Information
    Information Pending

    ^ back to top



    Results Publications

    ^ back to top


    Ground Based Results Publications

    ^ back to top


    ISS Patents

    ^ back to top


    Related Publications

      Ferrigno G, Pedrocchi AL, Baroni G, Bracciaferri F, Neri G, Pedotti A.  ELITE-S2: the facility for multifactorial movement analysis for the International Space Station: new perspectives for motion analysis technologies. Acta Astronautica. 2004; 54(10): 737-747.

       ELITE-S2: the Facility for Multifactorial Movement Analysis for the International Space Station New Perspectives For Motion Analysers Technologies. Conference and Exhibit on International Space Station Utilization, Cape Canaveral, FL; 2001 2001-4943.

      Pedrocchi AL, Baroni G, Sada S, Marcon E, Pedotti A, Ferrigno G.  Optimisation of shape kernel and threshold in image-processing motion analysers. Medical and Biological Engineering & Computing. 2001; 39(5): 525-533.

      Pedrocchi AL, Tagliabue M, Lanzani A, Baroni G, Ferrigno G, Pedotti A.  Motor strategies evaluation in long term microgravity exposure: simulation and comparison between CM control and net ankle moment control motor strategies. Gait and Posture. 2002; 14(2): 166.

      Amblard B, Assaiante C, Vaugoyeau M, Baroni G, Ferrigno G, Pedotti A, Massion J.  Voluntary head stabilization in space during oscillatory trunk movements in the frontal plane performed before, during and after prolonged period of weightlessness. Experimental Brain Research. 2001; 137: 170-179.

      Rigotti C, Cerveri P, Andreoni G, Pedotti A, Ferrigno G.  Modeling and Driving of a Reduced Human Mannequin through Motion Captured Data: a Network Approach. IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics. Part A, Systems and humans. 2001; 31: 187-193.

      Amir AR, Baroni G, Pedrocchi AL, Newman DJ, Ferrigno G, Pedotti A.  Measuring Astronaut Performance on the ISS: Advanced Kinematic and Kinetic Instrumentation. IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics. Part A, Systems and humans. 2001; 50(5): 1450-1455.

      Baroni G, Pedrocchi AL, Ferrigno G, Massion J, Pedotti A.  Motor coordination in weightless conditions revealed by long-term microgravity adaptation. Acta Astronautica. 2001; 49(3-10): 199-213.

      Pedrocchi AL, Baroni G, Ferrigno G, Massion J, Pedotti A.  EUROMIR 95 T4 experiment Human Posture in microgravity: global results and future perspectives. Journal of Gravitational Physiology. 2002; 9(1): 117-120.

      Baroni G, Pedrocchi AL, Ferrigno G, Massion J, Pedotti A.  Long-term adaptation of motor co-ordination in prolonged weightless conditions. Journal of Applied Physiology. 2001; 90(1): 205-215.

      Ferrigno G, Pedrocchi AL, Baroni G, Bracciaferri F, Neri G, Pedotti A.  ELITE S2 -- a New Instrument for Multifactorial Movement Analysis on the International Space Station. 54th International Astronautical Congress, Bremen, Germany; 2003 03-G.P.05.

      Pedrocchi AL, Pedotti A, Baroni G, Massion J, Ferrigno G.  Inverse dynamic investigation for voluntary trunk movements in weightlessness: a new microgravity-specific strategy. Journal of Biomechanics. 2003; 36: 1691-1700.

      Baroni G, Pedrocchi AL, Ferrigno G, Massion J, Pedotti A.  3-D motion capture and biomechanical modelling for neuroscience investigation in weightlessness. Kerala, India: Recent Research and Developments in Biomechanics; 2003.

    ^ back to top


    Related Websites

    ^ back to top



    Imagery

    image The calibration tool used for ELITE-S2.
    + View Larger Image


    image The Interface Management Unit (IMU) for ELITE-S2.
    + View Larger Image


    image The video camera for ELITE-S2.
    + View Larger Image


    image A subject performing a whole body protocols with applied markers.
    + View Larger Image


    image Astronaut, Benjamin (Al) Drew during a payload training dry-run for ELITE-S2.
    + View Larger Image


    image Garret Reisman executing the ELITE S2 protocol IMAGE.
    + View Larger Image


    image Garret Reisman calibrating the instrument: in the foreground, the calibration tool.
    + View Larger Image


    image NASA Image: ISS033E011716 - ELITE-S2 (ELaboratore Immagini TElevisive - Space 2) camera cables taken in the JAXA JPM (JEM Pressurized Module) by the Expedition 33 crew.
    + View Larger Image