Dose Distribution Inside ISS - Dosimetry for Biological Experiments in Space (DOSIS-DOBIES) - 08.20.14

Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery
ISS Science for Everyone

Science Objectives for Everyone
The Dose Distribution Inside ISS - Dosimetry for Biological Experiments in Space (DOSIS-DOBIES) provides documentation of the actual nature and distribution of the radiation field inside the ISS and develops a standard method to measure the absorbed doses in biological samples onboard the ISS.

Science Results for Everyone

I’ll see your radiation dose and double it. Two active and two passive radiation detectors collected data from different locations in the space station. Data from the passive detectors were analyzed on the ground while monthly downlinks collected data from the active detectors.  The passive thermoluminescence detectors (TLD) yielded data on daily dose rate measured with both neutron sensitive 6LiF and  non-neutron sensitive 7LiF. The data showed that the absorbed dose rate inside the Columbus module can vary up to 50 percent depending on location.



The following content was provided by Filip Vanhavere, Ph.D., Günter Reitz, Ph.D., and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.
Information provided courtesy of the Erasmus Experiment Archive.

Experiment Details

OpNom

Principal Investigator(s)

  • Filip Vanhavere, Ph.D., Belgium Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Mol, Belgium
  • Günter Reitz, Ph.D., German Aerospace Center, Köln, Germany

  • Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)
  • Rudolf Beaujean, Ph.D., University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany
  • Michael Hajek, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria
  • Jean Louis Genicot, Belgium Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Mol, Belgium
  • Istvan Apathy, KFKI Atomic Research Institute, Budapest, Hungary
  • Jozsef K. Palfalvi, Atomic Energy Research Institute, Budapest, Hungary
  • Frantisek Spurny, Ph.D., Nuclear Physics Institute, Rez, Czech Republic
  • Eric R. Benton, Eril Research Incorporated, Richmond, CA, United States
  • Marco Casolino, Ph.D., Universita of Roma Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
  • Denis O'Sullivan, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, Dublin, Ireland
  • Yukio Uchihori, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Japan
  • Nakahiro , National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Japan
  • Pawel Bilski, Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow, Poland
  • Pawel Olko, Institute for Nuclear Physics, Krakow, Poland
  • Vladislav P. Petrov, Institute for Biomedical Problems, Moscow, Russia
  • Cary Zeitlin, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, United States
  • Dazhuang Zhou, Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States
  • David Bartlett, National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton, United Kingdom
  • Eduardo G. Yukihara, Ph.D., Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, United States
  • Edward Neal Zapp, Ph.D., Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States
  • Luke Hager, National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton, United Kingdom
  • Stephen W. S McKeever, Stillwater, OK, United States
  • Edward Semones, Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States
  • Kazunobu Fujitaka, NIRS, Japan
  • M. Golighy, United States
  • Jack Miller, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, United States
  • F. van Havere, Belgium
  • Iva Jadrnickova, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic
  • Thomas Berger, German Aerospace Center, Köln, Germany
  • Marlies Luszik-Bhadra, Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig, Germany
  • Aiko Nagamatsu, Ph.D., Japan Aerospace and Exploration Agency, Tsukuba, Japan
  • Sandor Deme, KFKI Atomic Research Institute, Budapest, Hungary

  • Developer(s)
    European Space Agency (ESA), Noordwijk, , Netherlands

    German Aerospace Center (DLR), Cologne, , Germany

    Sponsoring Space Agency
    European Space Agency (ESA)

    Sponsoring Organization
    Information Pending

    Research Benefits
    Information Pending

    ISS Expedition Duration
    March 2009 - September 2011

    Expeditions Assigned
    19/20,21/22,23/24,25/26,27/28

    Previous ISS Missions
    DOSIS-DOBIES first began operations on ISS Expedition 18.

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    Experiment Description

    Research Overview

    • DOSIS will use both passive and active radiation measurement devices to measure the radiation environment inside of the Columbus module.


    • DOBIES will study the responses of different detector types in space radiation fields. This will lead to a unique recommendation and description on dosimetric systems for radiobiologocal experiments in space.


    • A total number of 64 measurement positions are allocated to the DOSIS-DOBIES investigations.

    Description
    Dose Distribution inside ISS (DOSIS): The proposed experiment will provide documentation of the actual nature and distribution of the radiation field inside the spacecraft. Integral measurements of energy, charge and LET spectra of the heavy ion component will be done by the use of different nuclear track detectors. TLDs deliver mission averaged absorbed doses. Different neutron dosimeters allow for measurement of the neutron dose.

    Dosimetry for Biological Experiments in Space (DOBIES): The objective of this project is to develop a standard Dosimetric method (as a combination of different techniques) to measure the absorbed doses and equivalent doses in biological samples, as a contribution to DOSIS in EPM and COL, and EXPOSE-E and EXPOSE-R payloads.

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    Applications

    Space Applications
    Information Pending

    Earth Applications
    Information Pending

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    Operations

    Operational Requirements
    Information Pending

    Operational Protocols
    DOSIS-DOBIES will consist of active radiation detectors: two DOSTEL silicon detectors, Alteino, tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC), Pille thermoluminescent detector (TLD) reader, passive radiation monitoring instruments and nuclear track detector packages (NTDP).

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    Results/More Information
    Information Pending

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    Results Publications

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    Ground Based Results Publications

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    ISS Patents

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    Related Publications

      Bilski P, Berger T, Hajek M, Hajek M, Twardak A, Koerner C, Reitz G.  Thermoluminescence fading studies: Implications for long-duration space measurements in Low Earth Orbit. Radiation Measurements. 2013 September; 56: 303-306. DOI: 10.1016/j.radmeas.2013.01.045.

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    Related Websites

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    Imagery

    image NASA Image: ISS015E12110 - View of the Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) Radiation Detector (gold cylinder) and the TEPC Spectrometer (gold box) in the U.S. Laboratory, Destiny during Expedition 15. The TEPC will be one of several radiation measurement devices used for DOSIS-BOBIES.
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