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Human Research Facility Holter Monitor
04.26.13
 
 

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Facility Summary

This content was provided by Cynthia P. Haven, and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.

Brief Summary

The Human Research Facility Holter Monitor (Holter) is a battery-powered, noninvasive electrocardiogram (ECG) device that accurately measures the heart rate of crewmembers over an extended period of time (up to 24 or 48 hours). ECG information is stored on a Portable Computer Memory Card International Adapter (PCMCIA) card and downlinked to Earth for analysis after monitoring is complete.

Facility Manager(s)

  • Cynthia P. Haven, Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States
  • Facility Representative(s)

    Information Pending

    Developer(s)

    Johnson Space Center, Human Research Program, Houston, TX, United States

    Sponsoring Space Agency

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

    Sponsoring Organization

    Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD)

    ISS Expedition Duration

    April 2006 - March 2010

    Expeditions Assigned

    13,14,15,16,17,18,19/20,21/22

    Previous ISS Missions

    Information Pending

    Availability

  • Onboard
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    Facility Overview

    • The Human Research Facility Holter Monitor (Holter) is a modified commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) device that accurately records the electrical activity of a crewmember's heart over an extended period of time (up to 24 or 48 hours). This noninvasive electrocardiogram (ECG) device is available to support future experiments.


    • The Holter is a three-channel, seven-lead ECG that can be placed in a variety of configurations, powered by one, two, or three 9V alkaline batteries, depending on the length of recording and desired sampling rate.


    • The Holter contains a removable Portable Computer Memory Card International Adapter (PCMCIA) card that allows the data to be stored, downloaded to a personal computer, and downlinked.
    The Human Research Facility Holter Monitor (Holter) measures and records the electrical activity of a crewmember's heart. The Holter is a battery-powered digital recorder that is capable of recording the electrocardiogram (ECG) data continuously for up to 24 or 48 hours. The Holter currently in use on the International Space Station is manufactured by Spacelabs Healthcare, Incorporated, of Issaquah, Washington.

    The Holter measures heart rates ranging from 0 to 240 beats per minute (bpm) at a sampling rate of 128 or 256 Hz. It measures ECG signals ranging from -2.5 to +2.5 mV (normal mode) and -5 to +5 mV (half-gain mode) at a sampling rate of 128 Hz or 256 Hz with an accuracy of 2 percent of full range. The Human Research Facility (HRF) Holter accessories kit is stowed during launch and landing. Prior to using the Holter, the crewmember takes the HRF Holter accessories kit from stowage, uses the razor to shave the electrode sites, wipes the area clean with biocide wipes, and applies the electrode pads to the chest in the configuration depicted on the placard. The crewmember then dons the hardware, attaches the Holter harness to the main unit, and activates the hardware. At the end of the recording period, the crewmember deactivates, doffs, and stows the hardware. For data download, the crewmember removes the hard disk card assembly from the main unit, plugs the card into the HRF personal computer (PC), and downloads the data to the HRF PC. Downlink of the Holter data is accomplished as part of HRF rack activities.

    Operations

    Facility Operations

    The Human Research Facility (HRF) Holter accessories kit is stowed during launch and landing. Prior to using the Holter, the crewmember takes the HRF Holter accessories kit from stowage, uses the razor to shave the electrode sites, wipes the area clean with biocide wipes, and applies the electrode pads to the chest in the configuration depicted on the placard. The crewmember then dons the hardware, attaches the Holter harness to the main unit, and activates the hardware. At the end of the recording period, the crewmember deactivates, doffs, and stows the hardware. For data download, the crewmember removes the hard disk card assembly from the main unit, plugs the card into the HRF personal computer (PC), and downloads the data to the HRF PC. Downlink of the Holter data is accomplished as part of HRF rack activities.

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    Results/More Information

    Information Pending

    Results Publications

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    Ground Based Results Publications

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    ISS Patents

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    Related Publications

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    Related Websites
  • ISS Medical Project
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    Imagery

    image NASA Image: JSC2006E01969 - Astronaut Clayton Anderson trains for Expedition 14 Holter operations with instructor Ashley Weaver at the Johnson Space Center in Houston.
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