Waving and Coiling of Arabidopsis Roots at Different g-levels (WAICO) - 05.13.15

Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery

ISS Science for Everyone

Science Objectives for Everyone
Waving and Coiling of Arabidopsis Roots at Different g-levels (WAICO) studies the interaction of circumnutation (the successive bowing or bending in different directions of the growing tip of the stems and roots) and gravitropism (a tendency to grow toward or away from gravity) in microgravity and 1-g of Arabidopsis thaliana.
Science Results for Everyone
Information Pending

The following content was provided by Günter F. E. Scherer, Ph.D., and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.
Information provided courtesy of the Erasmus Experiment Archive.
Experiment Details

OpNom:

Principal Investigator(s)
Günter F. E. Scherer, Ph.D., Leibniz Universitat, Hannover, Germany

Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)
Information Pending

Developer(s)
Information Pending

Sponsoring Space Agency
European Space Agency (ESA)

Sponsoring Organization
Information Pending

Research Benefits
Information Pending

ISS Expedition Duration
October 2007 - April 2008

Expeditions Assigned
16

Previous ISS Missions
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Experiment Description

Research Overview

  • Waving and Coiling of Arabidopsis Roots at Different g-levels (WAICO) will compare the waiving and coiling growth of Arabidopsis thaliana at different g-levels between 0-g and 1-g by time lapse imaging of the root growth over an approximately 2 week period on the ISS.


  • WAICO will also compare the response of gravitropic wild type A. thaliana with the agravitropic (growth without a gravitational response) AtPLA1 knockout, A. thaliana mutant, and observe root structure (postflight fixed samples), in particular microtubule orientation, to understand how the root structure contributes to the waving and coiling process.

Description
Waving and Coiling of Arabidopsis Roots at Different g-levels (WAICO) will help understand the interaction of circumnutation (the successive bowing or bending in different directions of the growing tip of the stems and roots) and gravitropism (a tendency to grow toward or away from gravity), by observing the waiving and coiling of Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and an agravitropic mutant (AtplaI-1 knockout). Specifically, Verify that circumnutation of Arabidoposis roots is driven by an endogenous mechanism, that is independent of gravity as a cue.

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Applications

Space Applications
Information Pending

Earth Applications
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Operations

Operational Requirements
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Operational Protocols
Two separate experiment runs will be performed each consisting of eight double sealed integrated experiment containers (IECDS). The experiment samples will be uploaded refrigerated, with the remaining hardware stored at ambient. Prior to the experiment, the samples (agar and seeds) will be stored refrigerated. After assembly of the samples into the experiment container the containers will be mounted on the rotors of the Biological Experiment Laboratory in Columbus (BioLab) with video observation which will be downlinked to the investigator daily. Each experiment run will last up to 14 days. Following each session, samples will be stored at 4 degrees C while on ISS and during return to Earth.

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Results/More Information

Information Pending

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Results Publications

    Scherer GF, Pietrzyk P.  Gravity-dependent differentiation and root coils in Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and phospholipase-A-I knockdown mutant grown on the International Space Station. Plant Biology. 2013 November; epub. DOI: 10.1111/plb.12123.

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Ground Based Results Publications

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ISS Patents

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Related Publications

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Related Websites
The information on this page is provided courtesy of the ESA Erasmus Experiment Archive.
Columbus Mission - European Experiment Programme
The Arabidopsis Information Resource

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Imagery

image Root coiling in wild type Arabidopsis thaliana (a, top) and mutant AtplaI-1 A. thaliana (b, bottom) plants tilted at a 45 degree angle on Earth. Image courtesy of ESA.
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image NASA Image: ISS016E031808 - View of Arabidopsis thaliana (commonly known as thale cress) plants growing in an experiment container for the Waving and Coiling of Arabidopsis Roots at Different g-levels (WAICO) experiment in the Biological Experiment Laboratory (BioLab) of the European Laboratory / Columbus module. Condensation is visible inside the container. Image was taken during Expedition 16.
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