In-flight Demonstration of Portable Load Monitoring Devices-Phase I: XSENS ForceShoeTM (Force Shoes) - 07.29.14

Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery
ISS Science for Everyone

Science Objectives for Everyone
Force Shoes is an engineering evaluation of the XSENS ForceShoe system as a potential method to measure exercise loads on the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) during exercise sessions on the International Space Station (ISS).  Up to four astronauts will be recruited to collect a series of static and dynamic load measurements using the ARED.  Researchers will use the measurements made by the XSENS ForceShoe system to quantify exercise load data which is needed for support of current and future human research experiments.

 

Science Results for Everyone
Information Pending



This content was provided by Andrea M. Hanson, Ph.D., and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.

Experiment Details

OpNom Force Shoes

Principal Investigator(s)

  • Andrea M. Hanson, Ph.D., NASA Johnson Space Cent, Houston, TX, United States

  • Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)
  • Lori L. Ploutz-Snyder, Ph.D., Universities Space Research Association, Houston, TX, United States
  • Brian T. Peters, Ph.D., Wyle Laboratories, Houston, TX, United States

  • Developer(s)
    Johnson Space Center, Human Research Program, Houston, TX, United States

    Sponsoring Space Agency
    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

    Sponsoring Organization
    Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD)

    Research Benefits
    Earth Benefits, Scientific Discovery, Space Exploration

    ISS Expedition Duration
    March 2014 - October 2015

    Expeditions Assigned
    39/40,41/42,43/44

    Previous ISS Missions
    Information Pending

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    Experiment Description

    Research Overview

    • Due to multiple issues associated with the load monitoring system of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) on the International Space Station (ISS), load data for exercise performed on that device is not provided. Force Shoes is an engineering evaluation of the XSENS ForceShoe system as a potential alternate method to measure loads imparted by the ARED.
    • Up to four astronauts will be recruited to perform a series of static and dynamic load measurements using the ARED.  A static load measurement on the ISS treadmill will also be included in order to compare the load data from the XSENS ForceShoe system with the ISS treadmill load sensors. Researchers will use measurements made by the XSENS ForceShoe system to quantify exercise load data which is needed for support of current and future human research experiments.    

     

    Description

    The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) instrumentation system was designed to provide exercise data to support real-time training and fulfill medical requirement reporting. The instrumentation was also meant to provide ground-based researchers with data to enhance training programs, better understand the connection between current on-orbit exercise prescriptions and musculoskeletal health, and aid in the design of future exercise devices. Due to unanticipated interruption to the mechanical performance of the force platform, reliably accurate data has not been available since ARED installation.  Due to a damaged power cable port, no data has been recorded through the ARED instrumentation system since mid-2011. As a result, NASA’s Human Research Program (HRP) has been carrying a risk (“Inability to obtain accurate, synchronized data from ISS exercise hardware for use in HRP studies”) since August 2010 which was elevated to a Top Program Risk as of April 2012.  Additionally, an ISS watch item (“Inability to access accurate ARED data used in HRP exercise research protocols”) has been carried since 2011.

     

    ARED load data is integral to many ongoing and future HRP and IP-funded studies. For example, the joint ESA/NASA ARED Kinematics study cannot start until accurate ground reaction force data can be recorded. Future HRP countermeasure studies will also need to understand the contribution that ARED loading makes to health outcomes, particularly to inform the design of advanced exercise countermeasure devices.  As result, HRP has funded the preliminary evaluation of portable load monitoring devices and technology demonstrations on the ISS. 

     

    The XSENS ForceShoe™ has gone through ground and parabolic flight evaluation, and has been selected as the first portable load monitoring device for a hardware demonstration aboard the ISS.

     

    Up to four crewmembers will be recruited for an engineering evaluation of the XSENS ForceShoes™ in order to assess the hardware system as a method to collect the required load data.  Following analysis of the in-flight data, a recommendation on the future use of the XSENS ForceShoe™ for operational and research use will be made.

     

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    Applications

    Space Applications

    The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) instrumentation system was designed to provide exercise data to support real-time training and fulfill medical requirement reporting.  Due to failures associated with the load measurements from the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) on the International Space Station (ISS), reliable accurate data has not been available since ARED installation and no data has been recorded since mid-2011. Force Shoes is an engineering evaluation of the XSENS ForceShoe system as a potential alternate method to measure loads imparted by ARED.  The Human Research Program (HRP) has been carrying a risk regarding the inability to obtain accurate, synchronized data from ISS exercise hardware for use in HRP studies since August 2010 which was elevated to a Top Program Risk as of April 2012.  ARED load data is integral to many active and future HRP and IP funded studies.  Future HRP countermeasure studies will need to understand the contribution that ARED loading makes to health outcomes, particularly to inform the design of advanced exercise countermeasure devices.  By extension, the assessment of the Force Shoe system may impact hardware systems and human research experiments for Exploration Class Missions.

    Earth Applications

    The Force Shoe evaluation will provide researchers and exercise trainers with data to help optimize muscle and bone strength training effects and increase time efficiency while performing exercise sessions. Lessons learned from exercise performed during long duration missions in microgravity can be directly applied to populations here on Earth that are restricted from activity due to an injury, ageing, busy lifestyles, or confined work and living spaces.

     

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    Operations

    Operational Requirements

    Up to four subjects will be recruited as part of this investigation in order to gather sufficient representative data to assess the fidelity of the hardware for use in current and future human research experiments. 

    Up to four sessions per subject may be scheduled to collect a series of load measurements on ARED in order to obtain a sufficient number of data points to develop calibration curves after the data is downlinked. During each session, static and dynamic data will be collected in different ARED configurations: ARED Main Exercise Bar in the high position, ARED Main Exercise Bar in the low position, and use of the ARED exercise cable.  Dynamic data collection during a subset of exercises typically performed on ARED will follow. Private high-definition video recording of each session is required in order to correlate Force Shoe data with crewmember actions. This video will be downlinked after each session. Privatized, real-time video in standard-definition is also required for the first performance of this session with each subject to assist the crew real-time and verify completion of objectives.

    Two inflight calibration sessions (no more than one per subject) are also required. A series of static load measurements on the T2 treadmill using different numbers of French clips with the bungees will be collected.  During the T2 session, the treadmill belt must be programmed to 0 mph.  The data collected via the Force Shoes and the T2 load cells will be downlinked and compared against each other by ground personnel.  As with the ARED sessions, private high-definition video recording with later downlink (to correlate Force Shoe data with crewmember actions) is required.  Privatized, real-time video in standard-definition is also required to assist the crew real-time and verify completion of objectives.

    A minimum of 14 days between data collection sessions (T2 or ARED) is required to allow the PI Team to evaluate the data from each session before another data collection session is performed.
     

     

    Operational Protocols

    During the T2 calibration session, the crewmember will setup the Force Shoe hardware by connecting the Force Shoes Wireless Receiver to an SSC, installing batteries into the Force Shoes Unit (router), and connecting the Force Shoes to the Force Shoes Unit (router) via the Force Shoes Comm Cables.  The Force Shoes will be allowed to warm-up for a minimum of 10 minutes during which the crewmember will watch a short video to describe the crew activity and setup the camera.  Before the T2 session, OCA will uplink a software profile in which the treadmill belt will be programmed to 0 mph while collecting force data.  To start, the crewmember will zero the force shoes, and take a zero-load measurement with the Force Shoes in a free float environment. Next, the crewmember will don the Force Shoe and take another zero load measurement while wearing the shoes in a free float environment. The crewmember will then stand on T2 while wearing the Force Shoe hardware system and transmitting data to the ISS server.  The crewmember will be tethered to the treadmill using a set of bungees per nominal operating procedures.  The crewmember will stand motionless on the treadmill for a few seconds to collect static load data on the Force Shoes and on T2.  Afterwards, a French clip will be added in-line between the bungees and the crewmember-worn harness, and another static load measurement will be taken.  The process will be repeated until there is no contact between the Force Shoes and the treadmill.  The data from T2 will be compared to the Force Shoe data after downlink. 

     

    Within 24 hours after a scheduled ARED cylinder evacuation activity, the crewmember will be scheduled to perform an ARED data collection session with the Force Shoes.  During the ARED data collection session, the crewmember will setup the Force Shoe hardware by connecting the Force Shoes Wireless Receiver to an SSC, installing batteries into the Force Shoes Unit (router), and connecting the Force Shoes to the Force Shoes Unit (router) via the Force Shoes Comm Cables.  The Force Shoes will be allowed to warm-up for a minimum of 10 minutes during which the crewmember will watch a short video to describe the crew activity and setup the camera.  Before the ARED sessions, OCA will uplink an exercise prescription similar to that used for regular ARED exercise sessions, but will instruct the crewmember to collect static load data.  To start, the crewmember will zero the force shoes, and take a zero-load measurement with the Force Shoes in a free float environment. Next, the crewmember will don the Force Shoe and take another zero load measurement while wearing the shoes in a free float environment. The crewmember will configure ARED with the Main Exercise Bar in the low position and with the load at the lowest setting for that session.  The crewmember will then lift the bar off of the stops for ten seconds.  The crewmember will then increase the load by 25-50 lbs and lift the bar off of the stops three times for ten seconds each time. This will be repeated incrementally until the maximal load for the sessions is reached.  The load will then be decreased incrementally until the minimal load for the session is reached.  Finally, the load will be increased incrementally for a second time until the maximal load for the session is reached so that three sets of data are collected for each load.  Next, the crew will repeat the process with the ARED Main Exercise Bar at the high position, and with the ARED exercise cable configured for bicep curls.  Finally, the crewmember will proceed with performing a subset of regular ARED exercises with the Force Shoes donned in order to collect dynamic data while performing regular ARED exercises.

     

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    Results/More Information
    Information Pending

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    Related Websites

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    Imagery

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    The XSENS ForceShoe™ is commercial off-the-shelf hardware that will be used to measure loads imparted by the ARED.  

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    Nasa Image: ISS033E022241- Expedition 32/33 crewmember Akihiko Hoshide performing squats on the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) aboard the ISS as part of his exercise regime to maintain musculoskeletal health.  

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    NASA Image: ISS025E005733 - Expedition 24/25 crewmember Shannon Walker standing on the treadmill belt while wearing the exercise harness with bungee attachments and a series of French clips.

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