NanoRacks-Maranatha Christian High School-Carbon Dioxide Monitor (NanoRacks-MCHS-CO2 Monitor) - 11.19.14

Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery
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Science Objectives for Everyone
NanoRacks-Maranatha Christian High School-Carbon Dioxide Monitor (NanoRacks-MCHS-CO2 Monitor) is a NanoLab project studying the fluctuation levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the microgravity space station in order to ensure  the astronauts are in a safe CO2 environment.

Science Results for Everyone
Information Pending



The following content was provided by Bill Miller, M.S, and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.

Experiment Details

OpNom NanoRacks Module-21

Principal Investigator(s)

  • Bill Miller, M.S, Maranatha Christian Schools, San Diego, CA, United States

  • Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)
  • Tim Day, Ph.D., Daylight Solutions, San Diego, CA, United States

  • Developer(s)
    NanoRacks, LLC, Webster, TX, United States

    Sponsoring Space Agency
    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

    Sponsoring Organization
    National Laboratory Education (NLE)

    Research Benefits
    Information Pending

    ISS Expedition Duration
    September 2012 - September 2013

    Expeditions Assigned
    33/34,35/36

    Previous ISS Missions
    Information Pending

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    Experiment Description

    Research Overview

    • NASA has issued a request for proposal (RFP) for carbon dioxide (CO2) sensor products. This research is needed to accumulate data in order to further develop a more efficient, cheaper, and reliable CO2 monitor.
    • NanoRacks-Maranatha Christian High School-Carbon Dioxide Monitor (NanoRacks-MCHS-CO2 Monitor) measures the CO2 levels in an operational microgravity space station. This experiment ensures that the CO2 levels do not reach a dangerous concentration within the station.
    • The NanoRacks-MCHS-CO2 Monitor experiment measures and records CO2 levels in a quick, easy, and efficient way. Also, depending on the success of the CO2 monitor, a cheaper and a less power consuming CO2 monitor for further space exploration will be built.

    Description

    The major hardware for the NanoRacks-Maranatha Christian High School-Carbon Dioxide Monitor (NanoRacks-MCHS-CO2 Monitor) includes a Telair T6615 CO2 sensor to read the CO2 levels and a LTI177 operational amplifier for a hardware controlled LED circuit. The NanoRacks-MCHS-CO2 Monitor experiment is designed to measure the ever changing CO2 levels on the International Space Station. A Telair T6615 CO2 sensor is used to measure the CO2. The sensor is the most crucial piece of the experiment. The T6615 measures the CO2 levels on the station every thirty seconds while peaking at 150 mA. To compensate for the current spike a super capacitor of 1 Farad is used. The capacitor is charged upon the application of electrical power by the crew member.   This allows for a second power source that the CO2 sensor can pull from eliminating the high current spike. The CO2 monitor sends out a reading to the four pins on the 26 pin jumper that reads all of the data. Those connections are read by the software that transfers into another LED Circuit controlled strictly by software. Another output goes to an operational amplifier, which regulates the voltage through the circuit in order to get the exact voltage, to another LED circuit for the hardware alarm from the output of the CO2 sensor and sensors on the NanoLab. The software stores the temperature, time, CO2 level, and humidity to record and compare with the levels of CO2.  

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    Applications

    Space Applications
    The NanoRacks-MCHS-CO2 Monitor experiment could lead to the development of cheaper and more efficient CO2 sensors and more ways to regulate CO2 on the station and future space exploration.

    Earth Applications
    NanoRacks-MCHS-CO2 Monitor may lead to better regulation of CO2 within closed concentrated buildings and constricting areas on Earth.

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    Operations

    Operational Requirements

    NanoRacks Module-21 is completely autonomous and only requires installation and removal. NanoRacks Module–21 returns on 33S.

    Operational Protocols

    Crew interaction with Module-21 is limited to transferring the NanoRacks locker Insert from the launch vehicle to the ISS, installation and activation of the NanoRacks Frames into the EXPRESS Rack Locker, cleaning of the air inlet filter (as necessary), and data retrieval (as needed) during the mission.

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    Results/More Information
    Information Pending

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    Related Websites
    NanoRacks

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    Imagery

    image The NanoRacks-Maranatha Christian High School-Carbon Dioxide Monitor (NanoRacks-MCHS-CO2 Monitor) final CO2 sensor assembly ready for insertion into the NanoLab. Image courtesy of Maranatha Christian High School.
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    image The NanoRacks-Maranatha Christian High School-Carbon Dioxide Monitor (NanoRacks-MCHS-CO2 Monitor) student designed board stuffed, wired, and mounted. Image courtesy of Maranatha Christian High School.
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    image Deputy Project Manager Hayden Wisniewski (left) and Project Manager Aaron Day display the final NanoRacks-Maranatha Christian High School-Carbon Dioxide Monitor (NanoRacks-MCHS-CO2 Monitor) sensor assembly. Image courtesy of Maranatha Christian High School.
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    image Project Manager Aaron Day explains NanoRacks-Maranatha Christian High School-Carbon Dioxide Monitor (NanoRacks-MCHS-CO2 Monitor) to Congressman Duncan Hunter while ISS Teammates Ethan Gwaltney and Hayden Wisniewski offer support. Image courtesy of Maranatha Christian High School.
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    image Student members of the 2012-2013 Maranatha Christian Schools ISS team who developed the NanoRacks-Maranatha Christian High School-Carbon Dioxide Monitor (NanoRacks-MCHS-CO2 Monitor), l to r: Ethan Gwaltney, Devin Olson, Luke Bronson, Chris Knutson, Kathleen Levi, April Harper, Aaron Day, and Hayden Wisniewski prepare to tackle space. Not shown: Maddie Gwaltney. Image courtesy of Maranatha Christian High School.
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    image Mentor Mike Knutson, and student Chris Knutson inspect test data for the NanoRacks-Maranatha Christian High School-Carbon Dioxide Monitor (NanoRacks-MCHS-CO2 Monitor) investigation. Image courtesy of Maranatha Christian High School.
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