NanoRacks-ArduSat-1 (NanoRacks-ArduSat-1) - 07.15.14

Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery
ISS Science for Everyone

Science Objectives for Everyone

NanoRacks-ArduSat-1 is a crowd-funded, open-platform CubeSat enabling students and space enthusiasts to explore space on their own. Students and teachers in middle school through graduate school design and program experiments, games or applications that the satellite performs. Hands-on activities include hunting meteors and taking photos from space, which spark student interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields while improving public access to space.
 

Science Results for Everyone
Information Pending



The following content was provided by Peter Platzer, Dipl. Ing., M.S., MBA, and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.

Experiment Details

OpNom ArduSat-1

Principal Investigator(s)

  • Peter Platzer, Dipl. Ing., M.S., MBA, NanoSatisfi Inc, San Francisco, CA, United States

  • Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)
    Information Pending
    Developer(s)
    NanoSatisfi Inc., San Francisco, CA, United States

    Sponsoring Space Agency
    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

    Sponsoring Organization
    National Laboratory Education (NLE)

    Research Benefits
    Information Pending

    ISS Expedition Duration
    March 2013 - March 2014

    Expeditions Assigned
    35/36,37/38

    Previous ISS Missions
    Information Pending

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    Experiment Description

    Research Overview

    • The US (as well as many of the European counterparts) faces a dire shortage of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) graduates.  This is particularly true in the aerospace sector, with the average age of the work-force is in their forties.

    • Today’s students prefer hands-on education, specifically in STEM areas rather than lecture-based education.

    • While there have been successes in using robotics to provide such hands-on education, due to the cost and complexity of space programs, it has been difficult to provide such an experience to students.

    • With NanoRacks-ArduSat-1, student and citizen scientists are able to perform hands-on space exploration by using a CubeSat or as a space camera for their own experiments, games or applications.

    • NanoRacks-ArduSat-1dramatically lowers the barrier for access to and participation in space exploration for the general public. 

    Description

    NanoRacks-ArduSat-1 provides the proof-of-concept for a commercially viable way to allow hundreds of thousands of students each year to participate personally in space exploration through hands-on experiences and experiments. This can have a dramatic impact on the number of students deciding to pursue education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.  The US (as well as many of the European counterparts) faces a dire shortage of STEM graduates (science, technology, engineering and math).  This is particularly true in the Aerospace sector, with the average age of the work-force is in their forties.  Today’s students prefer hands-on education, specifically in STEM areas, to only lecture-based education.  While there have been successes in using robotics to provide exactly such hands-on education, due to the cost and complexity of space programs, it has been difficult so far to provide such an experience to students.  Students and citizen scientists are able to perform hands on space exploration by using a CubeSat for their own experiments, games or applications or as a space camera. This dramatically lowers the barrier for access to and participation in space exploration for the generally public.

    Ease of use through a web-interface and intuitive User Interface/User Experience (UI/UX) through careful design are a major part of enabling the primary investigation objective. A complex chain of software is established for NanoRacks-ArduSat-1. On the hardware side, consumer-off-the-shelf (COTS) sensors like magnetometers, accelerometers, gyros and temperature sensors are connected via an augmented Inter-Integrated Circuit (I2C) protocol with more complex, yet still off-the-shelf sensors like Geiger counters, a camera and spectrometer. 

     

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    Applications

    Space Applications

    NanoRacks-ArduSat-1 uses commercial-off-the-shelf sensors for various applications, reducing costs and improving access. Reducing costs for small space hardware, especially in low-Earth orbit (LEO) and for pico-, nano- and micro-satellites, could enable new projects aimed at Earth observation and education.
     

    Earth Applications

    NanoRacks-ArduSat-1 provides a proof-of-concept for a commercially viable way to allow hundreds of thousands of students to participate in space exploration through hands-on experiences and experiments. The investigation dramatically lowers barriers for access to space and participation in space exploration, encouraging interest in STEM education and careers.
     

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    Operations

    Operational Requirements

    Remove the Remove-before-flight pin before launching the space-craft from the ISS. No other operational requirements and constraints are known or expected at this point in time. 

    Operational Protocols

    Communication with the space-craft via ground-stations of NanoSatisfi Inc. and partners of NanoSatisfi Inc.

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    Results/More Information
    Information Pending

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    Related Websites
    NanoRacks
    ArduSat - Your Arduino Experiment in Space
    NanoSatisfi

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    Imagery

    image
    Current rendering model of the NanoRacks-ArduSat-1 satellite (outside and inside). Actual parts are proprietary. Image courtesy of NanoSatisfi Inc.

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