Project Meteor (Project Meteor) - 01.09.14

Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery

ISS Science for Everyone

Science Objectives for Everyone Project Meteor's mission objective is to fly a visible spectroscopy instrument to the ISS NL for the primary purpose of observing meteors in Earth Orbit. It is anticipated that Project Meteor will conduct operations for approximately 2 years from the date that on orbit operations commence. SwRI will serve as the U.S. Host and will conduct this experiment on behalf of Chiba Institute of Technology, which is based in Japan.

Science Results for Everyone Information Pending



This content was provided by Randy Rose, and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.

Experiment Details

OpNom:

Principal Investigator(s)

  • Randy Rose, Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), Boulder, CO, United States
  • Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)
    Information Pending

    Developer(s)
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    Sponsoring Space Agency
    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

    Sponsoring Organization
    National Laboratory (NL)

    Research Benefits
    Information Pending

    ISS Expedition Duration:

    Expeditions Assigned
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    Previous ISS Missions

    Ballistic Missile and Defense Organization (BMDO) Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) Ultraviolet and Visible Imaging and Spectrographic Imaging (UVISI) instrument

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    Experiment Description

    Research Overview

    • Meteor spectra are commonly observed from the ground or aircraft by instruments pointing at the sky during a reliably known meteor shower. Meteors cross the field of view of the observer?s instrument and are recorded either photographically or electronically. Spectral measurements are made by a spectrograph, which records all wavelengths instantaneously. Investigators can then determine elemental abundances and temperatures by comparing known synthetic spectra to observed spectra. These ground or aircraft measurements however are limited to very short periods of observation time and small portions of the Earth?s atmosphere. Additionally, ground and aircraft based meteor observations are limited by ozone absorption in the terrestrial atmosphere. This absorption masks the important ?organic? carbon spectral emission. Satellite detectors can overcome these limits. Project Meteor will provide a continuous monitor of meteor interaction with the Earth?s atmosphere without limitations of the ozone absorption. The resultant data will be the first measurement of meteor flux and will allow for monitoring of carbon-based compounds. Investigation of meteor elemental composition is important to our understanding of how the planets developed.

    Description
    Information Pending

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    Applications

    Space Applications
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    Earth Applications
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    Operations

    Operational Requirements
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    Operational Protocols
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    Results/More Information

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    Related Websites

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    Imagery