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Expedition 12 Commander's Top Ten Photos from Space
10.16.06
Expedition 12 Commander William McArthur lived aboard the International Space Station from October 2005 to April 2006. These are his 10 favorite photos from space.

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West Point + High resolution photo (1.2 Mb)
+ Low resolution photo (69 Kb)




ISS012-E-08797 (20 Nov. 2005) --- West Point, NY, home of the United States Military Academy since 1802, is featured in this electronic still image recorded from the International Space Station during Expedition 12. West Point is located on the high west bank of the Hudson River north of New York City. North is at the top in this almost vertical view. (Image credit: NASA)

Houston Ship Channel + High resolution photo (1.8 Mb)
+ Low resolution photo (128 Kb)




ISS012-E-09567 (28 Nov. 2005) --- Houston Ship Channel, Texas is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 12 crewmember on the International Space Station. This view depicts the San Jacinto River portion of the Houston Ship Channel, one of the United States' busiest sea ports. The Channel provides a conduit between the continental interior and the Gulf of Mexico for both petrochemical products and Midwestern grain. The original watercourse for the Channel, Buffalo Bayou, has its headwaters 30 miles to the west of the city of Houston and has been used to move goods to the sea since at least 1836. Wakes of ships traveling along the channel are visible to the south of the Goat Islands (bright oblong islands at top center of image). The close proximity to Texas oilfields led to the establishment of numerous petrochemical refineries along the waterway, such as the Exxon Mobil Baytown installation on the eastern bank of the San Jacinto River. While much of the Ship Channel is associated with heavy industry, two icons of Texas history are also located along its length. A close search of the photo's details reveals both the battleship U.S.S. Texas and the neighboring San Jacinto Monument. The Texas saw service during both World Wars, and is the last remaining example of a dreadnought-class battleship in existence. The nearby San Jacinto Monument commemorates the 1836 battle in which Texas won its independence from Mexico. The monument itself is a 570 feet (173 meters) high shaft topped by a 34 feet (10 meters) high star, making it 15 feet (5 meters) higher than the Washington Monument in Washington, D.C. The Houston Ship Channel has been periodically widened and deepened to accommodate ever-larger ships, and is currently 530 feet (161 meters) wide by 45 feet (14 meters) deep by 50 miles (80 kilometers) long. The islands in the ship channel are part of the ongoing channel widening and deepening project--created by dredge spoils, salt marshes and bird islands are part of the Houston Port Authority's beneficial use and environmental mitigation responsibilities. (Image credit: NASA)

Aorounga Impact Crater, Chad + High resolution photo (1.8 Mb)
+ Low resolution photo (126 Kb)




ISS012-E-09639 (29 Nov. 2005) --- The impact of an asteroid or comet several hundred million years ago, according to scientists, left scars in the landscape that are still visible in this International Space Station/Expedition 12 picture of an area in the Sahara Desert of northern Chad. The concentric ring structure is the Aorounga impact crater, with a diameter of about 17 kilometers (10.5 miles). The original crater was buried by sediments, which were then partially eroded to reveal the current ring-like appearance. Scientists note a number of valleys cut by thousands of years of wind erosion. The area shown is centered at approximately 19.1 degrees north latitude and 19.3 degrees east longitude. (Image credit: NASA)

Tokarev during Russian EVA + High resolution photo (867 Kb)
+ Low resolution photo (89 Kb)




ISS012-E-16898 (3 Feb. 2006) --- Attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, cosmonaut Valery I. Tokarev, Expedition 12 flight engineer representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, participates in the second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) performed by the Expedition 12 crew during their six-month mission. During the five-hour, 43-minute spacewalk, Tokarev and astronaut William S. (Bill) McArthur (out of frame), commander and NASA space station science officer, released SuitSat, conducted preventative maintenance to a cable-cutting device, retrieved experiments and photographed the station's exterior. (Image credit: NASA)

Tokarev in Russian airlock + High resolution photo (1 Mb)
+ Low resolution photo (71 Kb)




ISS012-E-17019 (4 Feb. 2006) --- Attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, cosmonaut Valery I. Tokarev, Expedition 12 flight engineer representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, waves at the camera from inside the Pirs Docking Compartment of the International Space Station following the completion of the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA). (Image credit: NASA)

Crew photo + High resolution photo (1.2 Mb)
+ Low resolution photo (108 Kb)




ISS012-E-19203 (5 March 2006) --- Astronaut William S. (Bill) McArthur (left), Expedition 12 commander and NASA space station science officer, and cosmonaut Valery I. Tokarev, flight engineer representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, pose with a U.S. Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuit (left) and Russian Orlan spacesuit in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. (Image credit: NASA)

TMA-7 undocking + High resolution photo (13 Mb)
+ Low resolution photo (71 Kb)




ISS012-E-24219 (8 April 2006) --- Backdropped by a blanket of clouds, the Soyuz TMA-7 spacecraft departs from the International Space Station carrying astronaut William S. (Bill) McArthur Jr., Expedition 12 commander and NASA space station science officer; Russian Federal Space Agency cosmonaut Valery I. Tokarev, flight engineer; and Brazilian Space Agency astronaut Marcos C. Pontes. Undocking occurred at 2:48 p.m. (CDT) on April 8. (Image credit: NASA)

Suitsat deploy + High resolution photo (333 Mb)
+ Low resolution photo (18 Kb)




ISS012-E-24449 (3 Feb. 2006) --- Backdropped by the blackness of space and Earth's horizon, a spacesuit-turned-satellite called SuitSat began its orbit around the Earth after being released by the Expedition 12 crewmembers during a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) on Feb. 3, 2006. SuitSat, an unneeded Russian Orlan spacesuit, was outfitted by the crew with three batteries, internal sensors and a radio transmitter, which faintly transmitted recorded voices of school children to amateur radio operators worldwide. The suit will enter the atmosphere and burn up in a few weeks. (Image credit: NASA)

Soyuz launch + High resolution photo (725 Kb)
+ Low resolution photo (30 Kb)




JSC2005-E-40271 (1 Oct. 2005) --- A Soyuz rocket launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan with astronaut William S. McArthur, Jr., Expedition 12 commander; cosmonaut Valery I. Tokarev, flight engineer and Soyuz commander; and U.S. spaceflight participant Gregory Olsen aboard. The trio is on a mission to the International Space Station lasting six months for McArthur and Tokarev. Olsen will return with the current station crew, Expedition 11, after ten days in space under a commercial contract with the Russian Federal Space Agency. (Image credit: NASA/Victor Zelentsov)

Soyuz landing at dawn + High resolution photo (741 Kb)
+ Low resolution photo (25 Kb)




JSC2006-E-16029 (9 April 2006) --- A Russian search and rescue helicopter flies over Arkalyk airport, Kazakhstan. Astronaut William S. (Bill) McArthur, Jr., Expedition 12 commander and NASA space station science officer; cosmonaut Valery I. Tokarev, flight engineer and Soyuz commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency; and Brazilian astronaut Marco C. Pontes brought their Soyuz TMA-7 capsule to a pre-dawn landing on April 9, 2006 (Kazakhstan time). McArthur and Tokarev completed six months in space on the station, while Pontes spent 10 days in orbit. (Image credit: NASA/Victor Zelentsov)