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View of Hurricane Ike From Space Station
09.10.08
ISS017-E-015752 -- Hurricane Ike

ISS017-E-015752 (10 Sept. 2008) --- This picture of Hurricane Ike from earlier today was downlinked by the crew of the International Space Station, flying 220 statute miles above Earth. The center of the hurricane was near 23.8 degrees north latitude and 85.3 degrees west longitude, moving 300 degrees at 7 nautical miles per hour. The sustained winds were 80 nautical miles per hour with gusts to 100 nautical miles per hour and forecast to intensify. Photo Credit: NASA

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ISS017-E-015751 -- Hurricane Ike + View high-resolution image
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ISS017-E-015751 (10 Sept. 2008) --- This picture of Hurricane Ike from earlier today was downlinked by the crew of the International Space Station, flying 220 statute miles above Earth. The center of the hurricane was near 23.8 degrees north latitude and 85.3 degrees west longitude, moving 300 degrees at 7 nautical miles per hour. The sustained winds were 80 nautical miles per hour with gusts to 100 nautical miles per hour and forecast to intensify. Photo Credit: NASA


ISS017-E-015703 -- Hurricane Ike + View high-resolution image
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ISS017-E-015703 (9 Sept. 2008) --- Hurricane Ike covers more than half of Cuba in this image, photographed by the crew of ISS-17 aboard the International Space Station from a vantage point of 220 statute miles above Earth. The center of Ike was near 22.4 degrees north latitude and 82.4 degrees west longitude and moving 290 degrees at 11.7 miles per hour . Sustained winds were at 80.6 miles per hour, with gusts to 97.9 miles per hour and were forcast to strengthen as the eye moved back over the warm water in the gulf of Mexico. Photo Credit: NASA


ISS017-E-015708 -- Hurricane Ike + View high-resolution image
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ISS017-E-015708 (9 Sept. 2008) --- Hurricane Ike covers more than half of Cuba in this image, photographed by the crew of ISS-17 aboard the International Space Station from a vantage point of 220 statute miles above Earth. The center of Ike was near 22.4 degrees north latitude and 82.4 degrees west longitude and moving 290 degrees at 11.7 miles per hour . Sustained winds were at 80.6 miles per hour, with gusts to 97.9 miles per hour and were forecast to strengthen as the eye moved back over the warm water in the gulf of Mexico. Photo Credit: NASA


ISS017-E-015718 -- Hurricane Ike + View high-resolution image
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ISS017-E-015718 (9 Sept. 2008) --- Hurricane Ike covers more than half of Cuba in this image, photographed by the crew of ISS-17 aboard the International Space Station from a vantage point of 220 statute miles above Earth. The center of Ike was near 22.4 degrees north latitude and 82.4 degrees west longitude and moving 290 degrees at 11.7 miles per hour . Sustained winds were at 80.6 miles per hour, with gusts to 97.9 miles per hour and were forecast to strengthen as the eye moved back over the warm water in the gulf of Mexico. Photo Credit: NASA


ISS017-E-015732 -- Hurricane Ike + View high-resolution image
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ISS017-E-015732 (9 Sept. 2008) --- Hurricane Ike covers more than half of Cuba in this image, photographed by the crew of ISS-17 aboard the International Space Station from a vantage point of 220 statute miles above Earth. The center of Ike was near 22.4 degrees north latitude and 82.4 degrees west longitude and moving 290 degrees at 11.7 miles per hour . Sustained winds were at 80.6 miles per hour, with gusts to 97.9 miles per hour and were forecast to strengthen as the eye moved back over the warm water in the gulf of Mexico. Photo Credit: NASA


ISS017-E-015361 -- Hurricane Ike + View high-resolution image
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ISS017-E-015361 (5 Sept. 2008) --- When this image was taken of Hurricane Ike from the International Space Station's vantage point of 220 statute miles above Earth on Sept. 5, the eye of was centered at 23.3 degrees north latitude and 62.0 degrees west longitude and moving 260 degrees at 17.2 miles per hour. The winds were sustained at 121 miles per hour with gusts to 149.8 miles per hour. The hurricane had not yet passed over Cuba and entered the Gulf of Mexico when this photo was taken. Photo Credit: NASA