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Sunita Williams' Mission Log
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KSC-06PD-2632 -- Launch Director Mike Leinbach welcomes STS-116 Mission Specialist Sunita Williams The countdown continues...

Image to right: At the Shuttle Landing Facility, Launch Director Mike Leinbach (right) welcomes STS-116 Mission Specialist Sunita Williams upon her arrival at KSC aboard a T-38 jet aircraft for the launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. Image credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

Greetings from quarantine in Houston. We are getting ready to head down to sunny Florida tomorrow morning to go into the final preparations for the Space Shuttle Discovery launch, scheduled for Dec. 7, at 9:35 EST! I would like to welcome all of you to my webpage which will follow our mission as we continue to build the International Space Station (ISS) and "turn on" its permanent power source! The space shuttle mission should last about 12 days, approximately nine days of which is docked to the ISS.

When the shuttle undocks I'll stay onboard ISS. I will be taking the place of Thomas Reiter who has been part of the Expedition 14 crew living on the ISS for the past six months. I will join the two remaining Expedition 14 crewmembers, Michael Lopez-Alegria and Misha Tyurin. Thomas will return with the STS-116 crew and I will be on ISS for the next 6 months.

During my stay on the ISS, I plan to provide weekly journals to share my experiences with you. I will include topics such as:

1. Cool things we did this week
2. Cool places we flew over
3. Interesting space recipes
4. Weekly workout update

KSC-06PD-2641--  The STS-116 crew I invite all of you to join me in following our progress as we continue to build the ISS as well as continue to do science activities onboard. If you are interested in reading about the science experiments on ISS, please see the following website:
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Image to left: At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-116 crew poses for media representatives on hand for their arrival at KSC aboard T-38 jet aircraft for the launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. Photo Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

I challenge all of you to work out with me for 6 months. In general we work out 2 hours a day, just to equal the "work" humans have to exert walking around in the gravity of Earth. Gravity on Earth provides a force that keeps our bones and muscles working. In the microgravity of space, our bones and muscles are not taxed so they begin to atrophy. To prevent this we need to do 1 hour of cardio-vascular exercise and 1 hour of weight training per day. You're probably wondering how we do this in space...please stay tuned in and I will explain all this once I am settled into my new home.