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Second and Third Sounding Rockets Launched from the Marshall Islands
May 7, 2013
A NASA Terrier-Improved Malemute sounding rocket leaves the launch pad at Roi Namur, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, as part of the Equatorial Vortex Experiment. › Larger image
A NASA Terrier-Improved Orion sounding rocket leaves the launch pad at Roi Namur, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, as part of the Equatorial Vortex Experiment (EVEX). The rocket was launched 90 seconds after a Terrier-Oriole sounding rocket as part of a study of post-sunset solar storms. Credit: NASA/John Grant

The Equatorial Vortex Experiment (EVEX) was successfully conducted during the early morning hours (eastern time) May 7 from Roi Namur, Republic of the Marshall Islands. A NASA Terrier-Oriole sounding rocket was launched at 3:39 a.m. EDT and was followed by a launch of Terrier-Improved Malemute sounding rocket 90 seconds later. Preliminary indications are that both rockets released their vapor clouds of lithium or trimethyl aluminum, which were observed from various locations in the area, and all science instruments on the rockets worked as planned. More information on EVEX can be found at › http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sounding-rockets/news/evex.html

These were the second and third rockets of four planned for launch during this year's campaign in the Marshall Islands. The first and fourth rockets are supporting the Metal Oxide Space Cloud experiment (MOSC), which is studying radio frequency propagation.
 

Red and white vapor clouds filled the skies over the Marshall Islands as part of NASA's Equatorial Vortex Experiment. › Larger image
Red and white vapor clouds filled the skies over the Marshall Islands as part of NASA's Equatorial Vortex Experiment (EVEX). The red cloud was formed by the release of lithium vapor and the white tracer clouds were formed by the release of trimethyl aluminum (TMA). These clouds allowed scientists on the ground from various locations in the Marshall Islands to observe the neutral winds in the ionosphere. Credit: NASA/John Grant


To find out more about NASA's sounding rocket missions, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sounding-rockets/

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Page Last Updated: June 3rd, 2014
Page Editor: Holly Zell