STS-135 Flight Day 9 Gallery

  • STS-135 crew› View High-res
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    S135-E-008715 (16 July 2011) --- The four crew members of the Atlantis STS-135 mission pose for a picture on the spacecraft's flight deck. On the front row are NASA astronauts Doug Hurley (left) and Chris Ferguson, pilot and commander respectively. In the rear are NASA astronauts Sandy Magnus and Rex Walheim, both mission specialists. The U.S. flag pictured was flown on the first space shuttle mission, STS-1, and flew on this mission to be presented to the space station crew. It will remain onboard the station until the next crew launched from the U.S. will retrieve it for return to Earth. It will fly from Earth again, with the crew that launches from the U.S. on a journey of exploration beyond Earth orbit. Photo credit: NASA

  • Sandy Magnus› View High-res
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    S135-E-008732 (16 July 2011) --- NASA astronaut Sandy Magnus, STS-135 mission specialist, is pictured in the U.S. lab or Destiny on the International Space Station during the 11th day in space for the four crew members of the STS-135 Atlantis mission. Photo credit: NASA

  • Delmarva Peninsula› View High-res
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    S135-E-008791 (16 July 2011) --- While flying above the Atlantic Ocean, one of the members of the joint Atlantis-International Space Station crews took this photo of the Delmarva Peninsula from the orbiting complex on July 16, 2011. Photo credit: NASA

  • STS-135 and Expedition 28 crew members› View High-res
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    ISS028-E-016779 (16 July 2011)--- Inside the Zvezda service module on the International Space Station, space shuttle Atlantis and station crewmembers take a break from an extremely busy work agenda for photos and a social period. Not much time remains for such reunions, as undocking and separation activities are scheduled for a little over 48 hours from the time this photo was made. The STS-135 crew consists of NASA astronauts Chris Ferguson, Doug Hurley, Sandy Magnus and Rex Walheim; the Expedition 28 or station crew members are JAXA astronaut Satoshi Furukawa, NASA astronauts Ron Garan and Mike Fossum, and Russian cosmonauts Andrey Borisenko, Alexander Samokutyaev and Sergei Volkov.

  • Sandy Magnus› View High-res
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    ISS028-E-017074 (16 July 2011) --- When asked by a reporter if she noticed a difference in the International Space Station on her current visit with the Atlantis STS-135 crew, versus an earlier lengthy visit, NASA astronaut Sandy Magnus mentioned the Cupola's addition, which was not on the station during her earlier stay there. This is one of series of photos showing Magnus, mission specialist for the Space Shuttle Program's final flight, taking advantage of the zero gravity of space and the panoramic view provided by the multi-windowed Cupola.

  • Sandy Magnus› View High-res
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    ISS028-E-017077 (16 July 2011) --- When asked by a reporter if she noticed a difference in the International Space Station on her current visit with the Atlantis STS-135 crew, versus an earlier lengthy visit, NASA astronaut Sandy Magnus mentioned the Cupola's addition, which was not on the station during her earlier stay there. This is one of series of photos showing Magnus, mission specialist for the Space Shuttle Program's final flight, taking advantage of the zero gravity of space and the panoramic view provided by the multi-windowed Cupola.

  • Sandy Magnus› View High-res
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    ISS028-E-017083 (16 July 2011) --- When asked by a reporter if she noticed a difference in the International Space Station on her current visit with the Atlantis STS-135 crew, versus an earlier lengthy visit, NASA astronaut Sandy Magnus mentioned the Cupola's addition, which was not on the station during her earlier stay there. This is one of series of photos showing Magnus, mission specialist for the Space Shuttle Program's final flight, taking advantage of the zero gravity of space and the panoramic view provided by the multi-windowed Cupola.

  • Sandy Magnus› View High-res
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    ISS028-E-017067 (16 July 2011) --- When asked by a reporter if she noticed a difference in the International Space Station on her current visit with the Atlantis STS-135 crew, versus an earlier lengthy visit, NASA astronaut Sandy Magnus mentioned the Cupola's addition, which was not on the station during her earlier stay there. This is one of series of photos showing Magnus, mission specialist for the Space Shuttle Program's final flight, taking advantage of the zero gravity of space and the panoramic view provided by the multi-windowed Cupola.

  • Sandy Magnus› View High-res
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    ISS028-E-017042 (16 July 2011) --- When asked by a reporter if she noticed a difference in the International Space Station on her current visit with the Atlantis STS-135 crew, versus an earlier lengthy visit, NASA astronaut Sandy Magnus mentioned the Cupola's addition, which was not on the station during her earlier stay there. This is one of series of photos showing Magnus, mission specialist for the Space Shuttle Program's final flight, taking advantage of the zero gravity of space and the panoramic view provided by the multi-windowed Cupola.

  • Atlantis and its Orbital Boom Sensor System robot arm extension backdropped against Earth's horizon› View High-res
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    ISS028-E-017197 (16 July 2011) --- One of the members of the joint crews for STS-135 and International Space Station Expedition 28 exposed this image of Atlantis and its Orbital Boom Sensor System robot arm extension backdropped against Earth's horizon and a greenish phenomenon associated with Aurora Australis. One of the station's solar array panels appears at upper left. Because of exposure time needed for this type photographny, some of the stars in the background are blurred.