STS-134 Flight Day 2 Gallery

  • STS-134 Mission Specialist Michael Fincke› View High-res
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    S134-E-006531 (17 May 2011) --- Onboard space shuttle Endeavour, astronaut Michael Fincke, STS-134 mission specialist, merely needs to shove off one of his legs and leap and he transports his body from middeck to flight deck. In Earth-bound trainers, such a move required a stationary ladder. A former long-duration occupant of the International Space Station (ISS), Fincke joins five other veteran astronauts for this final mission of Endeavour -- a 16-day affair that will allow the crew to spend almost two full weeks onboard the orbiting ISS/shuttle joint complex. Docking day is a day away from the time this image was recorded. Photo credit: NASA

  • STS-134 Mission Specialist Roberto Vittori› View High-res
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    S134-E-006530 (17 May 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori, STS-134 mission specialist, seen here at controls on Endeavour's aft flight deck, interfaces with the external/remote systems which, as well as performing other chores, work together to inspect the shuttle for possible damage. Vittori is joining five other veteran astronauts for a 16-day mission -- Endeavour's farewell flight -- in Earth orbit. Docking with the International Space Station was only a day away at the time this picture was recorded. Photo credit: NASA

  • STS-134 Mission Specialists Andrew Feustel and Michael Fincke› View High-res
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    S134-E-006520 (17 May 2011) --- Astronauts Andrew Feustel (foreground) and Michael Fincke, both STS-134 mission specialists, work to keep order with the large inventory of supplies and equipment on Endeavour's middeck and airlock on the eve of docking day with the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA.

  • STS-134 Mission Specialists Greg Chamitoff and Roberto Vittori› View High-res
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    S134-E-006513 (17 May 2011) --- NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff, foreground, and European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori work at controls on the aft flight deck of the space shuttle Endeavour during the external inspection session which is traditionally conducted early in shuttle missions to determine any possible damage on the vehicle.The six-man crew is anticipating a docking with the International Space Station in less than 24 hours. Photo credit: NASA

  • STS-134 Pilot Greg H. Johnson› View High-res
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    S134-E-006508 (17 May 2011) --- NASA astronaut Greg H. Johnson, STS-134 pilot, works at controls on Endeavour's aft flight deck during the external inspection session which is traditionally conducted early in shuttle missions to determine any possible damage on the vehicle. The six-man crew is anticipating a docking with the International Space Station in less than 24 hours. Photo credit: NASA

  • STS-134 Mission Specialist Roberto Vittori› View High-res
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    S134-E-006507 (17 May 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori, STS-134 mission specialist, seen here at controls on Endeavour's aft flight deck, interfaces with the external/remote systems which, as well as performing other chores, work together to inspect the shuttle for possible damage. Vittori is joining five other veteran astronauts for a 16-day mission -- Endeavour's farewell flight -- in Earth orbit. Docking with the International Space Station was only a day away at the time this picture was recorded. Photo credit: NASA

  • Orbiter Boom Sensor System› View High-res
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    S134-E-006505 (17 May 2011) --- The Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS), pictured on the second flight day of STS-134, on left side of this photo showing Endeavour's vertical stabilizer and cargo bay, is a 50-foot boom carried onboard each of NASA's space shuttles. The boom can be grappled by the Canadarm and serves as an extension of the arm, doubling its length to a combined total of 100 feet (30 meters). At the far end of the boom is an instrumentation package of cameras and lasers used to scan the leading edges of the wings, the nose cap, and the crew compartment after each lift-off and before each landing. Photo credit: NASA

  • STS-134 Mission Specialist Roberto Vittori› View High-res
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    S134-E-006397 (17 May 2011) --- On Endeavour's middeck, European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori, STS-134 mission specialist, unpacks the laser range finder, which will come in handy in 24 hours on the shuttle's flight deck when the spacecraft and the International Space Station approach each other for docking. Photo credit: NASA

  • STS-134 Mission Specialist Michael Fincke› View High-res
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    S134-E-006395 (17 May 2011) --- Veteran NASA astronaut Michael Fincke, STS-134 mission specialist, appears delighted that, because of the weightlessness of space, he can renew doing chores which he can't do on Earth, like lifting heavy bags and floating freely at the same time. Fincke and five other astronauts share Endeavour with a large quantity of supplies and equipment as they head toward a date with the International Space Station (ISS). Endeavour was scheduled to link with ISS in less than 24 hours from the time this picture was recorded. Photo credit: NASA

  • STS-134 Mission Specialist Andrew Feustel› View High-res
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    S134-E-006392 (17 May 2011) -- During the second flight day of Endeavour's final mission, astronaut Andrew Feustel, STS-134 mission specialist, realizes he likely won't recognize this area of the spacecraft's middeck at mission's end in 16-days, when all the supplies and equipment will have been moved to other locations on the shuttle and on the International Space Station. Feustel and his five crewmates are settling in for almost two weeks of work on the orbital outpost. Photo credit: NASA