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  • Richard Jones› View High-res
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    JSC2011-E-021611 (24 Feb. 2011) --- From his console in the shuttle flight control room in Houston's Mission Control Center, Richard Jones, ascent flight director, directs his attention to a scene hundreds of miles away in Florida where the space shuttle Discovery nears time for liftoff from the Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39. Photo credit:NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  • Joshua Byerly› View High-res
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    JSC2011-E-021622 (24 Feb. 2011) --- Public Affairs Office (PAO) mission commentator Joshua Byerly, narrates ground activity at the Kennedy Space Center and ultimately describes the launch into space of the STS-133/Discovery mission from a position in the back of the shuttle flight control room in Houston's Mission Control Center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  • Charlie Hobaugh (left) and Barry Wilmore› View High-res
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    JSC2011-E-021653 (24 Feb. 2011) --- This is an overall view of the shuttle flight control room in Houston's Mission Control Center during the launch of STS-133/Discovery. The scene is from the central area of the room looking forward, and it features an aft view of astronauts Charlie Hobaugh (left) and Barry Wilmore at the Spacecraft Communicator or CAPCOM console. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  • Richard Jones (left) and Charlie Hobaugh› View High-res
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    JSC2011-E-021652 (24 Feb. 2011) --- This is an overall view of the shuttle flight control room in Houston's Mission Control Center during the launch of STS-133/Discovery. The scene is from the central area of the room looking forward, and it features an aft view of Richard Jones, ascent flight director, at his console (left), and astronaut Charlie Hobaugh at the Spacecraft Communicator or CAPCOM console. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  • Tony Ceccacci, Richard Jones, Charlie Hobaugh and Barry Wilmore› View High-res
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    JSC2011-E-021648 (24 Feb. 2011) --- This is a medium close-up view at the Flight Director's console in the shuttle flight control room in Houston's Mission Control Center during the prelaunch and launch activities of STS-133/Discovery. From the foreground to background (or from right to left) are Tony Ceccacci and Richard Jones, flight directors, and astronauts Charlie Hobaugh and Barry Wilmore, both at the Spacecraft Communicator or CAPCOM console. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  • Richard Jones (left) and Charlie Hobaugh› View High-res
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    JSC2011-E-021643 (24 Feb. 2011) --- This is an overall view of the shuttle flight control room in Houston's Mission Control Center during the launch of STS-133/Discovery. The scene is from the central area of the room looking forward, and it features a profile view of Richard Jones, ascent flight director, at his console (left), and astronaut Charlie Hobaugh at the Spacecraft Communicator or CAPCOM console. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  • Richard Jones› View High-res
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    JSC2011-E-021621 (24 Feb. 2011) --- From his console in the shuttle flight control room in Houston's Mission Control Center, Richard Jones, ascent flight director, directs his attention to a scene hundreds of miles away in Florida where the space shuttle Discovery nears time for liftoff from the Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39. Photo credit:NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  • Barry Wilmore› View High-res
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    JSC2011-E-021604 (24 Feb. 2011) --- During preflight phases of STS-133, it was the duty of astronaut Barry Wilmore, seen here at the Spacecraft Communicator or CAPCOM console in the shuttle flight control room of Houston's Mission Control Center, to keep an eye on the weather. Weather did not play a negative role in the Feb. 24 launch of the space shuttle Discovery. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration