STS-133 Flight Day 6 Gallery

  • International Space Station› View High-res
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    S133-E-007467 (1 March 2011) --- Backdropped by the thin line of Earth's atmosphere and the blackness of space, a docked Russian Soyuz spacecraft (right), a portion of the International Space Station's Quest airlock and solar array panels are featured in this image photographed by an STS-133 crew member while space shuttle Discovery remains docked with the station. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  • Nicole Stott› View High-res
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    S133-E-007474 (1 March 2011) --- NASA astronaut Nicole Stott, STS-133 mission specialist, is pictured in the Cupola of the International Space Station while space shuttle Discovery remains docked with the station. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  • Michael Barratt› View High-res
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    S133-E-007475 (1 March 2011) --- NASA astronaut Michael Barratt, STS-133 mission specialist, is pictured in the Cupola of the International Space Station while space shuttle Discovery remains docked with the station. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  • Permanent Multipurpose Module› View High-res
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    S133-E-007577 (1 March 2011) --- In the grasp of the International Space Station's Canadarm2, the Italian-built Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) is transferred from space shuttle Discovery's payload bay to be permanently attached to the Earth-facing port of the station's Unity node. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  • Permanent Multipurpose Module› View High-res
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    S133-E-007589 (1 March 2011) --- In the grasp of the International Space Station's Canadarm2, the Italian-built Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) is transferred from space shuttle Discovery's payload bay to be permanently attached to the Earth-facing port of the station's Unity node. Earth's horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  • Permanent Multipurpose Module› View High-res
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    S133-E-007596 (1 March 2011) --- In the grasp of the International Space Station's Canadarm2, the Italian-built Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) is transferred from space shuttle Discovery's payload bay to be permanently attached to the Earth-facing port of the station's Unity node. Earth's horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  • Permanent Multipurpose Module› View High-res
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    S133-E-007600 (1 March 2011) --- In the grasp of the International Space Station's Canadarm2, the Italian-built Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) is transferred from space shuttle Discovery's payload bay to be permanently attached to the Earth-facing port of the station's Unity node. Earth's horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  • Eric Boe (foreground) and Cady Coleman› View High-res
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    S133-E-007735 (1 March 2011) --- NASA astronauts Eric Boe (foreground), STS-133 pilot; and Cady Coleman, Expedition 26 flight engineer, work controls at a robotic workstation in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station while space shuttle Discovery remains docked with the station. European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 26 flight engineer, is at right. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  • Eric Boe and Cady Coleman› View High-res
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    S133-E-007739 (1 March 2011) --- NASA astronauts Eric Boe, STS-133 pilot; and Cady Coleman, Expedition 26 flight engineer, work controls at a robotic workstation in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station while space shuttle Discovery remains docked with the station. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  • Eric Boe and Cady Coleman› View High-res
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    S133-E-007740 (1 March 2011) --- NASA astronauts Eric Boe, STS-133 pilot; and Cady Coleman, Expedition 26 flight engineer, work controls at a robotic workstation in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station while space shuttle Discovery remains docked with the station. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration