STS-132 Flight Day 5 Gallery

  • Space shuttle Atlantis› View High-res
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    ISS023-E-046806 (18 May 2010) --- Backdropped by Earth's horizon and the blackness of space, the docked space shuttle Atlantis is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 23 crew member on the International Space Station. The Russian-built Mini-Research Module 1 (MRM-1) is visible in the payload bay as the shuttle robotic arm prepares to unberth the module from Atlantis and position it for handoff to the station robotic arm (visible at right). Named Rassvet, Russian for "dawn," the module is the second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia and will be permanently attached to the Earth-facing port of the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB). Rassvet will be used for cargo storage and will provide an additional docking port to the station.

  • Shuttle and station crew members› View High-res
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    ISS023-E-046833 (18 May 2010) --- Six of the twelve crew members currently on the space shuttle Atlantis/International Space Station tandem are pictured in the Kibo laboratory of the orbital outpost while the shuttle remains docked with the station. Pictured are Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov (left foreground), Expedition 23 commander; and NASA astronaut Ken Ham (top), STS-132 commander. Also pictured (from the left background) are NASA astronaut Piers Sellers, STS-132 mission specialist; Russian cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov, Expedition 23 flight engineer; along with NASA astronauts Garrett Reisman, STS-132 mission specialist; and Tracy Caldwell Dyson, Expedition 23 flight engineer.

  • Shuttle and station crew members› View High-res
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    ISS023-E-046836 (18 May 2010) --- Five of the twelve crew members currently on the space shuttle Atlantis/International Space Station tandem are pictured in the Kibo laboratory of the orbital outpost while the shuttle remains docked with the station. Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, Expedition 23 commander, is at left foreground. Also pictured (from the left background) are NASA astronaut Piers Sellers, STS-132 mission specialist; Russian cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov, Expedition 23 flight engineer; along with NASA astronauts Garrett Reisman, STS-132 mission specialist; and Tracy Caldwell Dyson, Expedition 23 flight engineer.

  • Space shuttle Atlantis› View High-res
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    ISS023-E-047431 (18 May 2010) --- Intersecting the thin line of Earth's atmosphere, the docked space shuttle Atlantis is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 23 crew member on the International Space Station. The Russian-built Mini-Research Module 1 (MRM-1) is visible in the payload bay as the shuttle robotic arm prepares to unberth the module from Atlantis and position it for handoff to the station robotic arm. Named Rassvet, Russian for "dawn," the module is the second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia and will be permanently attached to the Earth-facing port of the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB). Rassvet will be used for cargo storage and will provide an additional docking port to the station.

  • Russian-built Mini-Research Module 1› View High-res
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    ISS023-E-047462 (18 May 2010) --- In the grasp of the station's robotic Canadarm2, the Russian-built Mini-Research Module 1 (MRM-1) is moved to be permanently attached to the Earth-facing port of the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB) of the International Space Station. Named Rassvet, Russian for "dawn," the module is the second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia. Rassvet will be used for cargo storage and will provide an additional docking port to the station.

  • Russian-built Mini-Research Module 1› View High-res
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    ISS023-E-047488 (18 May 2010) --- In the grasp of the station's robotic Canadarm2, the Russian-built Mini-Research Module 1 (MRM-1) is moved to be permanently attached to the Earth-facing port of the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB) of the International Space Station. Named Rassvet, Russian for "dawn," the module is the second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia. Rassvet will be used for cargo storage and will provide an additional docking port to the station.

  • Russian-built Mini-Research Module 1› View High-res
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    ISS023-E-047527 (18 May 2010) --- In the grasp of the station's robotic Canadarm2, the Russian-built Mini-Research Module 1 (MRM-1) is attached to the Earth-facing port of the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB) of the International Space Station. Named Rassvet, Russian for "dawn," the module is the second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia. Rassvet will be used for cargo storage and will provide an additional docking port to the station.

  • Tony Antonelli› View High-res
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    S132-E-008258 (18 May 2010) --- NASA astronaut Tony Antonelli, STS-132 pilot, is pictured on the aft flight deck of space shuttle Atlantis while docked with the International Space Station.

  • Starboard wing of space shuttle Atlantis› View High-res
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    S132-E-008302 (18 May 2010) --- Backdropped by Earth's horizon and the blackness of space, a portion of the starboard wing of space shuttle Atlantis is featured in this image photographed by an STS-132 crew member while docked with the International Space Station.

  • Mini-Research Module 1› View High-res
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    S132-E-008114 (18 May 2010) --- In the grasp of the Canadarm2, the Russian-built Mini-Research Module 1 (MRM-1) is transferred from space shuttle Atlantis' payload bay to be permanently attached to the Earth-facing port of the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB) of the International Space Station. Named Rassvet, Russian for "dawn," the module is the second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia. Rassvet will be used for cargo storage and will provide an additional docking port to the station.