STS-131 Flight Day 4 Gallery

  • Columbus module› View High-res
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    S131-E-008457 (8 April 2010) --- With the European Space Agency's Columbus module in the foreground, one of the STS-131 Discovery astronauts took this photo from the International Space Station while the two linked spacecraft were passing over the Mediterranean Sea approximately 215 miles below. The island of Cyprus is partially visible among the clouds.

  • The station's robotic Canadarm2 relocates the Leonardo Multi-purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) from space shuttle Discovery's payload bay› View High-res
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    ISS023-E-020718 (8 April 2010) --- The station's robotic Canadarm2 relocates the Leonardo Multi-purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) from space shuttle Discovery's payload bay to a port on the Harmony node of the International Space Station.

  • Space shuttle Discovery and the International Space Station› View High-res
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    S131-E-007745 (7 April 2010) --- The station's robotic Canadarm2 grapples the Leonardo Multi-purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) from the payload bay of the docked space shuttle Discovery (STS-131) for relocation to a port on the Harmony node of the International Space Station. Earth's horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene. Canadian-built Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM), is visible at bottom center.

  • Space shuttle Discovery and the International Space Station› View High-res
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    S131-E-007752 (7 April 2010) --- The station's robotic Canadarm2 grapples the Leonardo Multi-purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) from the payload bay of the docked space shuttle Discovery (STS-131) for relocation to a port on the Harmony node of the International Space Station. The bright sun and Earth's horizon provide the backdrop for the scene. Canadian-built Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM), is visible at bottom center.

  • Space shuttle Discovery and the International Space Station› View High-res
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    S131-E-007768 (7 April 2010) --- The station's robotic Canadarm2 grapples the Leonardo Multi-purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) from the payload bay of the docked space shuttle Discovery (STS-131) for relocation to a port on the Harmony node of the International Space Station. Earth's horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene. Canadian-built Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM), is visible at left.

  • Two Russian spacecraft docked with the International Space Station› View High-res
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    S131-E-007789 (8 April 2010) --- Two Russian spacecraft docked with the International Space Station are featured in this image photographed by an STS-131 crew member while space shuttle Discovery remains docked with the station. Earth's horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

  • The aft section of the docked space shuttle Discovery› View High-res
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    S131-E-007836 (8 April 2010) --- The aft section of the docked space shuttle Discovery is featured in this image photographed by an STS-131 crew member on the International Space Station. The Gulf of Suez and Gulf of Aqaba are seen 215 miles below.

  • The International Space Station and space shuttle Discovery› View High-res
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    S131-E-007048 (7 April 2010) --- The station's robotic Canadarm2 grapples the Leonardo Multi-purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) from the payload bay of the docked space shuttle Discovery (STS-131) for relocation to a port on the Harmony node of the International Space Station. Earth's horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

  • Soichi Noguchi, Naoko Yamazaki (right) and Stephanie Wilson› View High-res
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    S131-E-007052 (7 April 2010) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronauts Soichi Noguchi, Expedition 23 flight engineer; and Naoko Yamazaki (right), STS-131 mission specialist; along NASA astronaut Stephanie Wilson, STS-131 mission specialist, pose for a photo in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station while space shuttle Discovery remains docked with the station.

  • Alan Poindexter, Stephanie Wilson (center) and Naoko Yamazaki› View High-res
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    STS131-E-007054 (7 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Alan Poindexter, STS-131 commander; along with NASA astronaut Stephanie Wilson (center) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Naoko Yamazaki, both mission specialists, pose for a photo in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station while space shuttle Discovery remains docked with the station.