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STS-116 Flight Day 11 Gallery
 
International Space Station+ View High-res
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S116-E-07154 (19 Dec. 2006) --- Backdropped by the blackness of space, clouds and Earth's horizon, the International Space Station is seen as it and Space Shuttle Discovery begin their relative separation. Earlier the STS-116 and Expedition 14 crews concluded eight days of cooperative work onboard the shuttle and station. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 4:10 p.m. (CST) on Dec. 19, 2006. Astronaut William A. (Bill) Oefelein, STS-116 pilot, was at the controls for the fly-around, which gave Discovery's crew a look at its handiwork, a new P5 spacer truss segment and a fully retracted P6 solar array wing. During their stay on orbital outpost, the combined crew installed the newest piece of the station's backbone and completely rewired the power grid over the course of four spacewalks.
The International Space Station+ View High-res
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STS116-301-028 (19 Dec. 2006) --- Backdropped by the blackness of space and Earth's horizon, the International Space Station moves away from Space Shuttle Discovery. Earlier the STS-116 and Expedition 14 crews concluded eight days of cooperative work onboard the shuttle and station. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 4:10 p.m. (CST) on Dec. 19, 2006. Astronaut William A. (Bill) Oefelein, STS-116 pilot, was at the controls during the fly-around, which gave Discovery's crew a look at its handiwork, a new P5 spacer truss segment and a fully retracted P6 solar array wing. During their stay on orbital outpost, the combined crew installed the newest piece of the station's backbone and completely rewired the power grid over the course of four spacewalks. This image was recorded with a 35mm film-equipped camera.
The International Space Station+ View High-res
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STS116-303-031 (19 Dec. 2006) --- Backdropped by a cloud-covered Earth, the International Space Station moves away from Space Shuttle Discovery. Earlier the STS-116 and Expedition 14 crews concluded eight days of cooperative work onboard the shuttle and station. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 4:10 p.m. (CST) on Dec. 19, 2006. Astronaut William A. (Bill) Oefelein, STS-116 pilot, was at the controls during the fly-around, which gave Discovery's crew a look at its handiwork, a new P5 spacer truss segment and a fully retracted P6 solar array wing. During their stay on orbital outpost, the combined crew installed the newest piece of the station's backbone and completely rewired the power grid over the course of four spacewalks. This image was recorded with a 35mm film-equipped camera.
Aurora Borealis+ View High-res
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S116-E-07308 (19 Dec. 2006) --- The Aurora Borealis, also known as "northern lights", is featured in this photograph taken by a STS-116 crew member onboard Space Shuttle Discovery during flight day 11 activities. The long exposure on the digital still camera enabled the astronaut to capture stars and city lights.
Thomas Reiter works with experiment+ View High-res
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S116-E-07446 (19 Dec. 2006) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Thomas Reiter, STS-116 mission specialist, works with the Passive Observatories for Experimental Microbial Systems in Micro-G (POEMS) payload in the Minus Eighty Degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station while Space Shuttle Discovery was docked with the station. MELFI is a low temperature freezer facility with nominal operating temperatures of -80, -26 and +4 degrees Celsius that will preserve experiment materials over long periods.
The International Space Station moves away from Space Shuttle Discovery+ View High-res
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S116-E-07104 (19 Dec. 2006) --- Backdropped by the blackness of space and Earth's horizon, the International Space Station moves away from Space Shuttle Discovery. Earlier the STS-116 and Expedition 14 crews concluded eight days of cooperative work onboard the shuttle and station. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 4:10 p.m. (CST) on Dec. 19, 2006. Astronaut William A. (Bill) Oefelein, STS-116 pilot, was at the controls for the fly-around, which gave Discovery's crew a look at its handiwork, a new P5 spacer truss segment and a fully retracted P6 solar array wing. During their stay on orbital outpost, the combined crew installed the newest piece of the station's backbone and completely rewired the power grid over the course of four spacewalks.
The International Space Station moves away from Space Shuttle Discovery+ View High-res
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S116-E-07106 (19 Dec. 2006) --- Backdropped by the blackness of space and Earth's horizon, the International Space Station moves away from Space Shuttle Discovery. Earlier the STS-116 and Expedition 14 crews concluded eight days of cooperative work onboard the shuttle and station. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 4:10 p.m. (CST) on Dec. 19, 2006. Astronaut William A. (Bill) Oefelein, STS-116 pilot, was at the controls for the fly-around, which gave Discovery's crew a look at its handiwork, a new P5 spacer truss segment and a fully retracted P6 solar array wing. During their stay on orbital outpost, the combined crew installed the newest piece of the station's backbone and completely rewired the power grid over the course of four spacewalks.
The International Space Station moves away from Space Shuttle Discovery+ View High-res
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S116-E-07141 (19 Dec. 2006) --- Backdropped by a blue and white Earth, the International Space Station moves away from Space Shuttle Discovery. Earlier the STS-116 and Expedition 14 crews concluded eight days of cooperative work onboard the shuttle and station. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 4:10 p.m. (CST) on Dec. 19, 2006. Astronaut William A. (Bill) Oefelein, STS-116 pilot, was at the controls for the fly-around, which gave Discovery's crew a look at its handiwork, a new P5 spacer truss segment and a fully retracted P6 solar array wing. During their stay on the orbital outpost, the combined crew installed the newest piece of the station's backbone and completely rewired the power grid over the course of four spacewalks.
The International Space Station moves away from Space Shuttle Discovery+ View High-res
+ View Low-res


S116-E-07153 (19 Dec. 2006) --- Backdropped by the blackness of space and Earth's horizon, the International Space Station moves away from Space Shuttle Discovery. Earlier the STS-116 and Expedition 14 crews concluded eight days of cooperative work onboard the shuttle and station. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 4:10 p.m. (CST) on Dec. 19, 2006. Astronaut William A. (Bill) Oefelein, STS-116 pilot, was at the controls for the fly-around, which gave Discovery's crew a look at its handiwork, a new P5 spacer truss segment and a fully retracted P6 solar array wing. During their stay on orbital outpost, the combined crew installed the newest piece of the station's backbone and completely rewired the power grid over the course of four spacewalks.
The International Space Station moves away from Space Shuttle Discovery+ View High-res
+ View Low-res


S116-E-07159 (19 Dec. 2006) --- Backdropped by the blackness of space, the International Space Station moves away from Space Shuttle Discovery. Earlier the STS-116 and Expedition 14 crews concluded eight days of cooperative work onboard the shuttle and station. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 4:10 p.m. (CST) on Dec. 19, 2006. Astronaut William A. (Bill) Oefelein, STS-116 pilot, was at the controls for the fly-around, which gave Discovery's crew a look at its handiwork, a new P5 spacer truss segment and a fully retracted P6 solar array wing. During their stay on orbital outpost, the combined crew installed the newest piece of the station's backbone and completely rewired the power grid over the course of four spacewalks.