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Space Shuttle Canadarm Robotic Arm Gallery
11.09.06
 
First flight of Canadarm
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STS002-13-226 -- On Space Shuttle mission STS-2, Nov. 1981, the Canadarm is flown in space for the first time. Photo Credit: NASA


Canadarm with PDP
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STS003-09-444 -- On Space Shuttle mission STS-3, March 1982, the Canadarm is used to capture and maneuver an object-- the plasma diagnostics package (PDP) Photo Credit: NASA


Canadarm deploys PFTA
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STS008-35-1239 -- On Space Shuttle mission STS-8, Sept. 1983, the Canadarm is used to deploy an object--the payload flight test article (PFTA). Photo Credit: NASA


Canadarm used as platform
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S84-27040 -- On Space Shuttle mission STS-41B, Feb. 1984, the Canadarm was used as a platform for spacewalk work by astronauts Bruce McCandless II (pictured) and Robert L. Stewart. Photo Credit: NASA


Canadarm activates Syncom satellite
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STS51D-39-007 -- On Space Shuttle Mission STS-51D, April 1985, an improvised "fly swatter" is used by the Canadarm to activate the Syncom satellite. Photo Credit: NASA


Astronaut Jerry Ross
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61B-41-019 -- Secured on a foot restraint device connected to the Canadian-built remote manipulator system arm aboard the Earth orbiting Atlantis, astronaut Jerry Ross, in Nov. 1985, participates (with astronaut Sherwood Spring, out of frame) in a STS-61B demonstration of future space station construction. The pictured tower was called Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures. Photo Credit: NASA


LDEF retrieval
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STS032-85-029 -- On Jan. 12 1990, the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), after five-and-one half years orbiting Earth, is retrieved by STS-32 crewmembers. Astronaut Bonnie J. Dunbar (out of frame in the shirt sleeve environment of Columbia) controlled the Canadarm in order to capture and bring LDEF back home for scientific study and observation. Photo Credit: NASA


STS-49 astronauts hold Intelsat VI
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STS049-91-026 -- Three STS-49 crewmembers hold onto the 4.5-ton Intelsat VI satellite in May 1992 after a six-handed "capture" was made minutes earlier. Left to right are astronauts Richard J. Hieb, Thomas D. Akers and Pierre J. Thuot. Thuot stands on the end of the Canadarm, which was instrumental as a mobile working platform in the capture. Photo Credit: NASA


Jeff Hoffman with Canadarm
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STS061-105-026 -- Astronaut Jeffrey A. Hoffman, in Dec. 1993, signals directions to European Space Agency astronaut Claude Nicollier (out of frame), as the latter controls the Canadarm during the third of five spacewalks on the Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission. Astronauts Hoffman and F. Story Musgrave earlier had changed out the Wide Field\Planetary Camera (WF\PC). Photo Credit: NASA


Robotic arms
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STS100-347-007 --- An unprecedented "handshake in space" occurred on April 28, 2001, as the Canadian-built space station robotic arm (right), also referred to as Canadarm2, transferred its launch cradle over to Endeavour's Canadian-built robotic arm. Photo Credit: NASA


Boom and sensor system with Canadarm
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JSC2005-E-02441 --- Computer-generated art showing the 50-foot long boom and sensor system, which joined forces with the Canadarm, to perform an in-flight inspection of the shuttle heat shield on the first Return to Flight mission, July 2005, to ensure its safety for entry.