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Curiosity Broadcasts Images to Times Square
08.22.12
 
Crowds watch the The Toshiba Vision screen in Times Square during the landing of NASA’s Curiosity rover on Mars. Image Credit: Toshiba Crowds watch the The Toshiba Vision screen in Times Square during the landing of NASA’s Curiosity rover on Mars. Image Credit: Toshiba
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The Toshiba Vision screen in Times Square displays images from NASA’s Curiosity rover on Mars. Image credit: Toshiba The Toshiba Vision screen in Times Square displays images from NASA’s Curiosity rover on Mars. Image credit: Toshiba
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The Toshiba Vision screen in New York City's Times Square is giving visitors and New York City locals the opportunity to see photos from NASA’s Curiosity rover on Mars.

The Toshiba Vision screen will broadcast photos taken by the Curiosity rover from now through October 15, with new photos being added every two weeks. The rover is just beginning its two years of unprecedented scientific detective work after a successful landing on Aug. 5, 2012.

"NASA is committed to engaging the American public in our missions, said David Weaver, Associate Administrator for NASA’s Office of Communications. “Curiosity has sparked people’s imagination and excitement, and we are thrilled to have this opportunity to continue showing the many people who walk through Times Square every day the amazing work the rover is doing on Mars."

Prominently positioned below the world-famous New Year's Eve ball in Times Square, the Toshiba Vision dual LED screens hosted a viewing party for thousands of people during Curiosity’s landing. The broadcast from JPL Mission Control and the first pictures from Mars were viewed by locals and visitors who came to Times Square to participate in the biggest NASA planetary science mission ever attempted. People watched as Curiosity landed on Mars from many different places around the country. Watch video.

Curiosity will investigate whether an area with a wet history inside Mars' Gale Crater ever has offered an environment favorable for microbial life.

The mission is managed by JPL for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. Curiosity was designed, developed and assembled at JPL. For more about NASA's Curiosity mission, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mars and http://marsprogram.jpl.nasa.gov/msl.

 
 
Sarah Ramsey
NASA Headquarters, Washington
sarah.ramsey@nasa.gov