Browse Archive

  • NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings

    Opportunity's Surroundings After Backwards Drive, Sol 1850

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,850th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (April 7, 2009).

  • NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings

    Opportunity's Surroundings After Backwards Drive, Sol 1850 (Stereo)

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,850th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (April 7, 2009).

  • Researchers used the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit to look for dust devils near the rover during the mission's 1,919th Martian day.

    Huge Dust Devil Northwest of Spirit, Sol 1919

    Researchers used the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit to look for dust devils near the rover during the mission's 1,919th Martian day, or sol (May 27, 2009).

  • The panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit was taking exposures with different color filters during the 1,919th Martian day.

    Colorful Effect from Sequential Shots of Moving Dust Devils

    While the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit was taking exposures with different color filters during the 1,919th Martian day of the rover's mission (May 27, 2009), dust devils moved across the field of view.

  • The navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit caught this stereo view of a dust devil during the 1,913th Martian day.

    Dust Devil West of Spirit, Sol 1913 (Stereo)

    The navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit caught this stereo view of a dust devil during the 1,913th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission on Mars (May 21, 2009).

  • Rover team members prepare an experiment for assessing how a test rover moves when embedded in loose soil and commanded to drive backward with wheels turned.

    Position Markers in Preparation for Test

    Mars Exploration Rover team members at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., prepare an experiment on July 13, 2009, for assessing how a test rover moves when embedded in loose soil and commanded to drive backward with wheels turned.

  • Mars Exploration Rover team members prepare a testing setup for the Spirit rover.

    After a Crabwalk Test

    Mars Exploration Rover team members prepare a testing setup for a subsequent experiment after an experiment driving the rover in a crablike motion, with all four corner wheels angled to the right.

  • finished heat shield for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory

    Large Heat Shield for Mars Science Laboratory

    The finished heat shield for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory is the largest ever built for descending through the atmosphere of any planet.

  • Engineers check the exact position of a test rover in preparation for the next test of a possible maneuver for Spirit to use on Mars.

    Preparing for Next Test

    Mike Seibert and Sharon Laubach, engineers on the Mars Exploration Rover team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, check the exact position of a test rover in preparation for the next test of a possible maneuver for Spirit to use on Mars.

  • Rover driver Paolo Bellutta measures how much the rover moved sideways, downslope, during the maneuver.

    Assessing Movement of Test Rover

    After commanding five of a test rover's six wheels to drive forward, rover driver Paolo Bellutta measures how much the rover moved sideways, downslope, during the maneuver.

  • Sandbox setup to test and assess possible moves for getting Mars rover Spirit out of a patch of loose Martian soil.

    Test Setup for Effort to Free Spirit

    Sandbox setup at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is ready for engineers to use the test rover to assess possible moves for getting Mars rover Spirit out of a patch of loose Martian soil.

  • a test rover rolls off a plywood surface into a prepared bed of soft soil

    Test Rover Sinks into Prepared Soil

    While a test rover rolls off a plywood surface into a prepared bed of soft soil, rover team members Colette Lohr (left) and Kim Lichtenberg (center) eye the wheels digging into the soil and Paolo Bellutta enters the next driving command.

  • Rover team members add a barrowful of soil mixture to the sloped box where a test rover will be used.

    Filling the Simulated Sandtrap

    Rover team members Mike Seibert (left) and Paolo Bellutta add a barrowful of soil mixture to the sloped box where a test rover will be used for assessing possible manuevers for NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit to use in escaping from a sandtrap on Mars.

  • Rover team members fill a mixer with powdered clay and diatomaceous earth.

    Preparing a Test Mixture

    Rover team members Kim Lichtenberg (left) and Mike Seibert fill a mixer with powdered clay and diatomaceous earth.

  • soft soil exposed when wheels of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit dug into a patch of ground

    Variations in Soft Soil of 'Troy' (False Color)

    The soft soil exposed when wheels of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit dug into a patch of ground dubbed "Troy" exhibit variations in hue visible in this image, in which the colors have been stretched to emphasize the differences.

  • Traverse map until Sol 1923 for Mars Rover Opportunity

    Opportunity's traverse map through Sol 1923

    Where are the rovers now? - Opportunity's traverse map through Sol 1923

  • Traverse map until Sol 1923 for Mars Rover Spirit

    Spirit's traverse map through Sol 1945

    Where are the rovers now? - Spirit's traverse map through Sol 1945

  • Pastel colors swirl across Mars

    Improved Infrared Imaging from Changed Odyssey Orbit

    Pastel colors swirl across Mars, revealing differences in the composition and nature of the surface in this false-color infrared image taken on May 22, 2009,by the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) camera on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter.

  • Clara Ma and her sister Remmy Ma with engineers Suparna Mukherjee, Jaime Waydo and then Julie Townsend.

    Clara Ma Tours JPL

    Pictured here is Clara Ma (in front row on the right) and her sister Remmy Ma with engineers Suparna Mukherjee, Jaime Waydo and then Julie Townsend (back row).

  • Clara Ma with Suparna Mukherjee, Julie Townsend, and Jaime Waydo.

    Clara Ma Visits with JPL Engineers

    Clara Ma (in front) with Suparna Mukherjee, Julie Townsend, Jaime Waydo (in back row) are featured here in the laboratory where an engineering model of the next Mars rover, Curiosity, is being tested.