Feature

NASA Releases GOES-14 Satellite Video of Hurricane Bill
08.21.09
 
August 21, 2009

GOES-12 satellite image of Hurricane Bill on August 21 at 2:25 p.m. EDT > View video
NASA and NOAA's newest weather satellite, GOES-14, has captured some fascinating views of Hurricane Bill. This is a collection of a few quick movies put together by the GOES-14 team.
Credit: NASAOES Project
NASA has released a video of Hurricane Bill today from the GOES-14 satellite. The video was put together from a series of still frames taken by the satellite using both infrared and visible imagery and provides different views of Hurricane Bill on August 20.

Earlier this summer, NASA launched the latest Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, GOES-O. Recently operations have been turned over to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the satellite was renamed GOES-14. The satellite is still being tested in orbit, and it captured video of Hurricane Bill on August 20, while it was on its way to Bermuda.

The spectacular video is a collection of a few quick movies put together by the GOES-14 team from the NASA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

The video includes an impressive zoom-out, showing how big the hurricane is, relative to the hemisphere. Bill is a large hurricane, more than 1,200 kilometers (746 miles) across, and the storm’s partially cloud-filled eye is nearly 50 kilometers (31 miles) wide.

On August 20, the date of the movie, Hurricane Bill had sustained winds of 135 mph, making it a powerful Category 4 storm. At that time hurricane-force winds extended outward up to 80 miles from the center. On August 21, Bill's sustained winds were near 110 mph and hurricane force winds extended up to 115 miles.

For daily updates and new NASA satellite images on Hurricane Bill, visit NASA's Hurricane Web Page at http://www.nasa.gov/hurricane. For forecasts and advisories on Hurricane Bill, visit NOAA's National Hurricane Center page: http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/.

Text credit: Rob Gutro/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center