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Tropical Storm Tim (Southern Pacific Ocean)
03.18.13
 
AIRS image of Tim› Larger image
This infrared image of Cyclone Tim was captured on March 18 at 0355 UTC (March 17 at 11:55 p.m. EDT) by the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. The coldest cloud top temperatures and strongest thunderstorms appear in small area of purple off shore from southeastern Queensland. Credit: NASA/NRL
NASA Sees Remnants of Cyclone Tim Fading Near Southeastern Queensland

Infrared satellite imagery tells the temperature of the cloud tops within a tropical cyclone as well as the sea surface temperatures around the storms. A recent infrared image from NASA's Aqua satellite showed very little strength in the remnants of ex-cyclone Tim offshore from southeastern Queensland.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Cyclone Tim on March 18 at 0355 UTC (March 17 at 11:55 p.m. EDT). The AIRS image showed that cloud top temperatures had warmed significantly since the previous day as the low pressure area continues to weaken. The coldest cloud top temperatures and strongest thunderstorms appeared in small area offshore from southeastern Queensland.

On March 18 at 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT/10 p.m. local time, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia), the remnants of ex-cyclone Tim was located near 19.1 south latitude and 151.7 east longitude, was located about 190 nautical miles (218.6 miles/ 352 km) northeast of Mackay. Tim's remnants were drifting west at 2 knots (2.3 mph/3.7 kph). The Australian Bureau of Meteorology (ABOM) noted that Tim's remnants are causing rough to very rough seas and moderate south to southeasterly swell. According to ABOM, wind gusts to 40 knots (46 mph/74 kph) are possible from Tim's remnants.

As a result of Tim's close proximity to the Queensland coast, several warnings were posted on March 18 at 2:15 p.m. EDT/U.S. (12:15 a.m. local time, Brisbane on Tuesday, March 19). A Gale Warning is in effect from Townsville to Bowen and from Bowen to Yeppoon, Strong Wind Warnings are in effect from Cardwell to Townsville and from Yeppoon to Double Island Point, including Hervey Bay. A Coastal Waters Wind Warning was also posted for Cardwell to Double Island Point, including Hervey Bay.

ABOM expects Tim's remnants to move in a west-northwest direction towards the Queensland coast over the next few days.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



March 15, 2013

a formless purple blob limps in the waters between New Guinea and Australia This infrared image of Cyclone Tim was captured on March 15 at 0305 UTC (March 14 at 11:05 p.m. EDT) by the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. The coldest cloud top temperatures and strongest thunderstorms appear in purple. Credit: NASA/NRL
› Larger image
NASA Sees Cyclone Tim Weakening

Cyclone Tim has encountered some wind shear, and NASA satellite data confirmed that it is pushing the strongest thunderstorms west of the storm's circulation center.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared image if Cyclone Tim was captured on March 15 at 0305 UTC (March 14 at 11:05 p.m. EDT) The coldest cloud top temperatures and strongest thunderstorms.

On March 15, 2013 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Tim's maximum sustained winds were near 45 knots (51.7 mph/83.3 kph). Tim is moving east-southeastward at 10 knots (11.5 mph/18.5 kph) through the Coral Sea. Tim is centered near 16.2 south latitude and 154.2 east longitude, about 240 nautical miles (276.2 miles/444.5 km) east of Willis Island.

Infrared satellite imagery later on March 15 showed that Tim weakened since the AIRS image was captured earlier. The convection was decreasing and was being pushed over the western semi-circle from easterly wind shear. Microwave imagery showed that there was still an eye to the storm.

Cyclone Tim is moving along the southern edge of a near-equatorial ridge (elongated area) of high pressure. According to the forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, Tim is expected to slowly weaken because of a strengthening low pressure area in the upper levels of the atmosphere.

Forecasters expect that Tim will likely dissipate by the end of the weekend of March 16-17 and the remnants will track westward toward Australia.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



March 14, 2013

MODIS image of Tim› Larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of newborn Tropical Cyclone Tim in the Coral Sea on March 14, 2013 at 04:05 UTC (12:05 a.m. EDT). Note the large band of thunderstorms wrapping into the center from the south and east. Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Sees Cyclone Tim Develop in the Coral Sea

System 96P has been moving through the Coral Sea near northeastern Australia over the last couple of days, and today, March 14, NASA's Aqua satellite captured the storm as it matured into Tropical Storm Tim.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Tim in the Coral Sea on March 13, 2013 at 04:05 UTC (12:05 a.m. EDT). The MODIS image showed a large band of thunderstorms wrapping into the center of circulation from the south and east. Cyclone Tim's northeastern quadrant was brushing Papua New Guinea, and the western quadrant was brushing Queensland Australia's east coast. The MODIS image was created by the MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that animated infrared satellite imagery indicated that the low-level center is consolidating and Tim is showing improved deep convective banding of thunderstorms. An eye was spotted using microwave imagery.

On March 14 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Tim was located 15.2 south latitude and 150.3 east longitude, just 80 nautical miles north of Willis Island, Australia (which is located east of the mainland, Queensland). Maximum sustained winds are near 50 knots (57.5 mph/92.6 kph), and Tim is expected to intensify over the next couple of days before weakening.

Willis Island surface observations from early on March 14 showed peak sustained winds of 37 knots (42.5 mph/68.5 kph) gusting to 45 knots (51.7 mph/83.3 kph).

Tim is expected to move southeast, and pass east of Willis Island, then turn toward the west like a boomerang and head toward Queensland.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.