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Tropical Cyclone Jamala (Southern Indian Ocean)
05.13.13
 
AIRS image of Jamala› Larger image
When NASA’s Aqua satellite flew over the Indian Ocean on May 13 at0747 UTC 3:47 a.m. EDT, the AIRS instrument captured an image of both the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Jamala (right)in the Southern Indian Ocean, and Tropical Cyclone Mahasen (left) in the Northern Indian Ocean. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees the Remnants of Tropical Cyclone Jamala Fading

Tropical Cyclone Jamala ran into some harsh atmospheric conditions on May 11 in the Southern Indian Ocean and vertical wind shear tore the storm apart. NASA’s Aqua satellite captured an image of the remnants while the more powerful, more organized Tropical Cyclone Mahasen continued to strengthen to the north.

When NASA’s Aqua satellite flew over the Indian Ocean on May 13 at 0747 UTC (3:47 a.m. EDT), the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured an image of both the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Jamala in the Southern Indian Ocean, and Tropical Cyclone Mahasen in the Northern Indian Ocean.

At the time of the AIRS image, cloud top temperatures in Jamala’s remnant continued to warm as the cloud tops continued to drop. The remnants appeared as an amorphous blob. Tropical Cyclone Mahasen appeared at least three times larger than Jamala’s remnants, and had much colder cloud top temperatures. In fact, Mahasen had a large area of very strong thunderstorms with cloud top temperatures near -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius) that stretched from its center northeast of Sri Lanka, southwest over northern Sri Lanka. Thunderstorms with cloud top temperatures that cold have been known to be heavy rain makers.

Tropical Storm Jamala dropped below tropical depression status on May 11. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued their final warning on Jamala on May 11 at 2100 GMT 5 p.m. EDT). Jamala's last noted location was near 10.6 south latitude and 88.3 east longitude, or 960 nautical miles (1,105 miles/ 1,778 km) east-southeast of Diego Garcia. Jamala was moving to the east at 7 knots (8 mph/13 kph), and its maximum sustained winds had dropped significantly down to just 25 knots (28.7 mph/46.3 kph).

Jamala is now a remnant low pressure area in the Southern Indian Ocean being battered by wind shear and dissipating.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



May 10, 2013

NASA Sees Two Tropical Cyclones Competing in the Indian Ocean

MODIS image of Jamala› Larger image
NASA’s Terra satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Cyclone Jamala in the southern Indian Ocean (bottom) and the much larger Tropical Cyclone One B (01B) in the Northern Indian Ocean on May 10 at 04:25 UTC (12:25 a.m. EDT). Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
The Indian Ocean is alive with tropical activity today, May 10, as there’s a tropical storm in both the northern and southern oceans. Tropical Cyclone Jamala (formerly 24S) and newborn Tropical Cyclone 01B were both captured on one image from NASA’s Terra satellite today.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Terra satellite captured this visible image of compact Tropical Cyclone Jamala in the southern Indian Ocean and the much larger Tropical Cyclone One B (01B) in the Northern Indian Ocean on May 10 at 04:25 UTC (12:25 a.m. EDT).

On May 10 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Tropical Cyclone Jamala (formerly Cyclone 24S) had maximum sustained winds near 40 knots (46 mph/74 kph). It was centered near 8.7 south latitude and 86.2 east longitude, about 805 nautical miles (926.4 miles/1,491 km) east of Diego Garcia. Jamala is crawling to the south-southeast at 3 knots (3.4 mph/5.5 kph). Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Jamala to shift westward in movement and intensify up to hurricane strength.

A different look at Tropical Cyclone Jamala, using multi-spectral satellite imagery revealed a partially-exposed low-level circulation center and a large area of deep convection displaced over the western side of the storm.

North of the equator in the Northern Indian Ocean, newborn Tropical Cyclone 01B developed from low pressure System 92B. 01B formed near the northern tip of Sumatra. On May 10 at 0900 UTC Tropical Cyclone 01B had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots (40.2 mph/64.8 kph). It was located 1,052 nautical miles (1,211 miles/1,948 km) south of Chittagong, India, centered near 4.8 north latitude and 93.6 east longitude. Tropical Cyclone 01B was moving to the northeast at 4 knots (4.6 mph/7.4 kph) and is forecast to move northwest into the central Bay of Bengal.

Multi-spectral satellite imagery shows that the fragmented bands of thunderstorms that were seen yesterday, May 9, have now solidified, strengthened and have become tightly wrapped around 01B’s center.

Residents of northwestern Burma and eastern Bangladesh should keep a watch on Tropical Cyclone 01B. Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect 01B to intensify into hurricane force and make landfall on May 14 or 15 in northwestern Burma and eastern Bangladesh.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



May 09, 2013

AIRS image of 24S and 92B› Larger image
This infrared image taken from the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on May 8 at 1947 UTC (3:47 p.m. EDT) captured Tropical Storm 24S in the Southern Indian Ocean and low pressure System 92B in the Northern Indian Ocean. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Two Tropical Systems in Indian Ocean

Tropical Cyclone 24S is still maintaining tropical storm status in the Southern Indian Ocean, while low pressure System 92B continues to struggle in the Northern Indian Ocean. Both tropical systems were captured in one infrared NASA satellite image.

An infrared image of both storms was taken from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on May 8 at 1947 UTC (3:47 p.m. EDT). The infrared image is false colored to show temperatures. Tropical Cyclone 24S appeared as a large rounded area, where cloud top temperatures were as cold as -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius). Those very cold cloud top temperatures indicated very powerful thunderstorms that were reaching high into the troposphere and dropping moderate to heavy rainfall.

System 92B, however, appeared fragmented and disorganized, with scattered thunderstorms around its center and south of the center of circulation.

In the Southern Indian Ocean at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Tropical Cyclone 24S had maximum sustained winds near 40 knots (46 mph/74 kph). It was centered near 7.0 south latitude and 85.5. east longitude, about 774 nautical miles (890.7 miles/1,433 km) east of Diego Garcia. It was moving slowly to the south-southeast at 4 knots (4.6 mph/7.4 kph). 24S is expected to move to the west and strengthen to hurricane force, followed by a weakening over the days following.

In the Northern Indian Ocean, as indicated by AIRS satellite imagery, System 92B was having a much more difficult time organizing. At 23:30 UTC (7:30 p.m. EDT) on May 8, System 92B was centered near 6.2 north latitude and 91.4 east longitude, about 690 nautical miles (794 miles/1,278 km) east of Colombo, Sri Lanka. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center has reduced System 92B’s chances of becoming a tropical cyclone to low.

Regardless of whether System 92B becomes a tropical cyclone, there’s a lot of rainfall happening over the Indian Ocean today.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



May 08, 2013

MODIS image of Cyclone 24S› Larger image
This visible image taken from the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on May 8 at 0732 UTC (3:32 a.m. EDT) showed powerful convection and the strongest thunderstorms in Tropical Cyclone 24S were mostly south of the center of circulation. Credit: NASA/NRL
NASA Satellite Sees Birth of Tropical Cyclone 24S in Southern Indian Ocean

There’s a new tropical depression called Tropical Cyclone 24S in the Southern Indian Ocean and NASA’s Aqua satellite provided a visible look at the newborn tropical storm.

A visible image of System 94S was taken from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on May 8 at 0732 UTC (3:32 a.m. EDT). The MODIS data showed that strong convection and thunderstorms were wrapping into the center of circulation in a large band south of the center.

When NASA’s Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed over Cyclone 24S on May 8 at 1133 UTC (7:33 a.m. EDT), the TRMM Microwave imager confirmed the MODIS data, and showed overall improved structure of the system with strengthening central convection and shallow broken convective banding along the southern periphery.

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) on May 8, Tropical Cyclone 24S was packing maximum sustained winds near 35 knots (40 mph/64.8 kph), and is expected to strengthen over the next several days. Cyclone 24S was located near 6.0 south latitude and 83.9 east longitude, about 685 nautical miles (787.1 miles/ 1,267 km) east of Diego Garcia. Cyclone 24S is moving to the east-northeast at 4 knots (4.6 mph/7.4 kph).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Tropical Cyclone 24S to drift slowly to the southwest and then south over the next couple of days as it continues to intensify.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.