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Tropical Storm Dumile (Southern Indian Ocean)
01.04.13
 
This visible image from NASA's Aqua satellite shows Tropical Cyclone Dumile has moved south of La Reunion Island and Mauritius on Jan. 4, 2013 › View larger
This visible image from NASA's Aqua satellite shows Tropical Cyclone Dumile has moved south of La Reunion Island and Mauritius on Jan. 4, 2013 at 1020 UTC. Madagascar can be seen to the left of the storm. Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Sees Cyclone Dumile Moving Over Open Ocean

Cyclone Dumile is on a solo journey in a southeasterly direction over the open waters of the Southern Indian Ocean over the weekend of Jan. 5 and 6. NASA's Aqua satellite captured a stunning visible image of Dumile as it left La Reunion and Mauritius behind.

The MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer)instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a stunning visible image of Tropical Cyclone Dumile on Jan. 4, 2013 at 1020 UTC (5:20 a.m. EST) as it moved away from La Reunion Island and Mauritius. The MODIS image showed a tight swirl of clouds around Dumile's center as it maintained cyclone (hurricane) status, where the most powerful and highest thunderstorms were east and south of the center of circulation. The image also showed the eastern coast of Madagascar to the left of the storm.

Multispectral satellite imagery indicated that Dumile's eye had become ragged, and the storm was starting to elongate, indicating it is weakening.

At 0900 UTC (4 a.m. EST) on Jan. 4, Tropical Cyclone Dumile's maximum sustained winds were near 70 knots (80.5 mph/129.6 kph). It was located near 25.4 south latitude and 54.2 east longitude, about 260 miles (299.2 miles/ 481.5 km) south-southwest of La Reunion.

La Reunion remains on a blue alert, which is expected to be dropped as Dumile continues moving away. Dumile was moving to the south at 11 knots (2.6 mph/20.3 kph) and generating very rough seas with wave heights to 32 feet (9.7 meters).

Dumile will continue moving over open ocean and transition to an extra-tropical storm as it encounters stronger vertical wind shear and cooler waters.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Jan. 03, 2013

MODIS image of Dumile› Larger image
This visible image of Tropical Cyclone Dumile over La Reunion Island and Mauritius was captured by the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite on Jan. 3, 2013 at 0650 UTC. Dumile's center was just northwest of Reunion (left) and Mauritius (right). Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

AIRS image of Dumile› Larger image
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured these infrared images of Tropical Cyclone Dumile on Jan. 2 at 2123 UTC, and Jan. 3 at 0936 UTC. The purple areas indicate the coldest, highest clouds with heaviest rainfall. The circular blue area in the middle of the purple area on the Jan. 2 image is Dumile's center. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
Two NASA Satellites See Cyclone Dumile Over La Reunion and Mauritius

NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites captured visible and infrared data on Tropical Cyclone Dumile as it slammed into the islands of La Reunion and Mauritius in the Southern Indian Ocean.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Cyclone Dumile on Jan. 3, 2013 at 0650 UTC (1:50 a.m. EST/U.S.) The image showed Dumile's center was about 85 nautical miles (97.8 miles/157.4 km) northwest of Reunion Island and Mauritius, and the strongest thunderstorms appeared to be southwest of the center of circulation. The image was created at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured two infrared images of Tropical Cyclone Dumile on Jan. 2 at 2123 UTC (4:23 p.m. EST/U.S.) and Jan. 3 at 0936 UTC (4:36 a.m. EST/U.S.). The coldest, highest clouds with heaviest rainfall formed a ring around Dumile's center on Jan. 2 meaning that the storm's eye had formed. The satellite overpass on Jan. 3 provided a close-up of the most powerful thunderstorms happening over both La Reunion and Mauritius. Infrared imagery on Jan. 3 also showed that Dumile's eye had "closed." AIRS images are created at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

Both La Reunion and Mauritius Posted Advisories

Warnings are up for La Reunion on Jan. 3. The territory is on red alert and a local advisory is in effect for high winds, heavy rain, high ocean swells and rough surf along the coasts of the island. For updated warnings (in French), please visit: http://www.meteo.fr/temps/domtom/La_Reunion/meteoreunion2/.

Mauritius Meteorological Services issued the following forecast for Jan. 3: Cloudy skies with showers and thunderstorms, some rainfall will be heavy at times. Heavy rainfall may cause ponding of water. A northerly sustained wind is expected up to 30 km/h with gusts of 70 km/h, decreasing gradually. The public is advised not to venture near rivers and other water courses because of rough seas. An improvement in weather is expected on Jan. 4. For updates, visit: http://metservice.intnet.mu/.

Where is Cyclone Dumile's Center?

On Jan. 3 at 0900 UTC (4 a.m. EST/U.S.) Tropical Cyclone Dumile was centered just 85 nautical miles (97.8 miles/157.4 km) northwest of La Reunion, near 20.3 south latitude and 54.4 east longitude. Dumile's maximum sustained winds were near 65 knots (75 mph/120.4 kph) making it a category one hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale. Tropical-storm-force winds extended about 95 nautical miles (109.3 miles/176 km) from the center, meaning that La Reunion island was getting battered by them. Cyclone Dumile is moving southward at 13 knots (15 mph/24 kph) and is churning up very rough seas with wave heights up to 34 feet (10.3 meters).

Dumile continues to move south and will pass west of La Reunion today, Jan. 3, before turning toward the southeast and weakening. Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect that Dumile will begin transitioning into an extra-tropical storm in two days.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



Jan. 02, 2013

MODIS image of Dumile› Larger image
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on Jan. 2 at 1035 UTC showed powerful, high thunderstorms in a tight band wrapping into the center. Large bands of thunderstorms extended a couple hundred miles to the northwest and south. Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

TRMM image of Dumile› Larger image
On Dec. 31 at 0702 UTC (2:02 a.m. EST), NASA's TRMM satellite passed over consolidating System 96S, that later became Tropical Storm Dumile on Jan. 1. The heaviest rains (red) were falling at a rate of more than 2 inches (50 mm) per hour, mostly northwest of the center. Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
NASA Sees Tropical Storm Dumile Strengthen Off the Madagascar Coast

The low pressure area designated as System 96S in the Southern Indian Ocean became Tropical Storm Dumile on the first day of January, 2013 as NASA's TRMM satellite data showed the storm consolidating, organizing and intensifying. On Jan. 2, NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image that showed Dumile was getting better organized.

On Dec. 31 at 0702 UTC (2:02 a.m. EST), NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed over consolidating System 96S, that later became Tropical Storm Dumile on Jan. 1. When TRMM passed over System 96S its radar noticed the heaviest rainfall was occurring northwest of the center of circulation. The heaviest rainfall was being pushed from southeasterly wind shear that continued on Jan. 1. There were also multiple areas of heavy rainfall where rain was falling at a rate of more than 2 inches (50 mm) per hour.

On Jan. 1, 2013 at 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST) Tropical Storm Dumile's winds were near 45 knots (51.7 mph/83.3 kph). Dumile was centered near 12.5 south latitude and 55.6 east longitude, about 550 nautical miles of La Reunion. Dumile was moving to the southwest at 8 knots (9.2 mph/14.8 kph).

On Jan. 1, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) noted "satellite imagery showed that the low level circulation center appears to be displaced slightly to the southeast of the main convection," as a result of wind shear. Strong upper level winds are currently stirring up moderate southeasterly vertical wind shear as high as 20 knots (23 mph/37 kph).

By Jan. 2, 2013 at 0900 UTC (4 a.m. EST/U.S.), wind shear had relaxed, and Tropical Storm Dumile's maximum sustained winds had increased to 55 knots (63.2 mph/102 kph). It was centered over the Southern Indian Ocean, east of Madagascar, near 15.4 south latitude and 55.8 east longitude. That puts Dumile's center about 370 nautical miles (425.8 miles/685.2 km) north of La Reunion, which is the general direction the storm is heading. Dumile is now moving south-southeast (it was moving southwest) at 14 knots (16.1 mph/26 kph).

In a visible image taken from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite, bands of thunderstorms wrapping around the storm's center appeared more organized. Aqua flew over Dumile on Jan. 2 at 1035 UTC (5:35 a.m. EST/U.S.). The MODIS image showed powerful, high thunderstorms in a tight band wrapping into the center from the north, to the east and south. Large bands of thunderstorms extended a couple hundred miles to the northwest and south.

On Jan. 2, Dumile is moving along the western edge of a subtropical ridge (elongated area) of high pressure. Forecasters at the JTWC expect Dumile to steadily intensify into a cyclone over the next two days. After that time, cooler sea surface temperatures will weaken the storm.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center