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Tropical Storm Barry (Atlantic)
June 20, 2013
 

June 20, 2013-> Barry Expected to Dissipate Rapidly After Landfall

AIRS instrument image of Barry The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft captured this infrared image of Tropical Storm Barry in the Gulf of Mexico's Bay of Campeche at 07:53 UTC (3:53 a.m. EDT) on June 20, 2013, as the storm was about to make landfall in southern Mexico. At the time, Barry had maximum sustained winds of 40 knots (46 miles per hour, or 74 kilometers per hour), gusting to 50 knots (58 miles per hour, or 93 kilometers per hour). The AIRS image shows Barry's cloud top temperatures, with the coldest clouds and most powerful thunderstorms depicted in shades of purple. The storm is expected to rapidly dissipate after making landfall. Rainfall totals of 3 to 5 inches (7.6 to 12.7 centimeters), locally up to 10 inches (25.4 centimeters) are possible in southern Mexico, along with life-threatening flash floods and mudslides.
Credit: NASA JPL
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TRMM image of Barry Barry's center of circulation made landfall on June 20 just north of Veracruz, Mexico, between 1200 and 1300 UTC with 40kt(~46 mph) winds. This image uses data captured when the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission satellite had a good view of tropical storm Barry on June 20, 2013, at 1510 UTC (10:10 AM CDT). A rainfall analysis from TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) data found rain falling at the rate of over 66mm/hr (~2.5 inches) in well defined bands spiraling from the Bay Of Campeche into tropical storm Barry's eastern side.
Credit: NASA/Goddard/TRMM/Hal Pierce
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June 19, 2013

Satellites See Tropical Storm Barry Form in the Bay of Campeche

GOES image of North America showing Tropical Storm Barry

NOAA's GOES-13 satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Barry just after it became a tropical storm on June 19. The GOES-13 image showed that Barry had attained better circulation in the last 24 hours. The image was created by NASA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.
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The second tropical storm of the Atlantic hurricane season formed close to where the second storm of the Eastern Pacific season died, in the Bay of Campeche.

Tropical Storm Barbara fell apart after crossing Mexico and moving into the Bay of Campeche two weeks ago, and now the second named storm of the Atlantic season formed there. Tropical Storm Barry strengthened from tropical depression 2 as of 1:45 p.m. EDT on June 19.

At that time, Barry's center was located near 19.6 north latitude and 95.1 west longitude, just 75 miles (115 km) east- northeast of Veracruz, Mexico, where it is expected to make landfall in the next day. Maximum sustained winds are now up to 40 mph (65 kph), and Barry is moving west at 10 mph. Minimum central pressure is near 1005 millibars. Tropical Storm Warnings are in effect along the coast near Veracruz.

NOAA's GOES-13 satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Barry just after it became a tropical storm on June 19. The GOES-13 image showed that Barry had attained better circulation in the last 24 hours. The image was created by NASA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 



June 17, 2013

Second Atlantic Season Tropical Depression Forms

GOES image of tropical depression 2

NOAA's GOES-13 satellite captured an image of Tropical Depression 2 on June 17 at 1:10 p.m. EDT. Looking closely at the imagery, strong thunderstorms are firing up around the center of circulation, just off-shore from Belize. The clouds associated with the depression stretch much farther, from far western Cuba, to the eastern Yucatan Peninsula, and over Belize and Honduras.
Credit: NASA GOES Project
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Tropical Depression 2 formed in the western Caribbean Sea during the early afternoon hours (Eastern Daylight Time) on June 17. NOAA's GOES-13 satellite captured an image of the storm as it consolidated enough to become a tropical depression while approaching the coast of Belize. NOAA's GOES-13 satellite sits in a fixed orbit and monitors the weather in the eastern half of the continental United States and the Atlantic Ocean. NASA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland uses the data from GOES-13 and creates imagery. NASA's GOES Project created an image of Tropical Depression 2 from June 17 at 1:10 p.m. EDT. Looking closely at the imagery, strong thunderstorms are firing up around the center of circulation, just off-shore from Belize. The clouds associated with the depression stretch much farther, from far western Cuba, to the eastern Yucatan Peninsula, and over Belize and Honduras.

The National Hurricane Center designated the low pressure area as Tropical Depression 2 at 11 a.m. EDT. At that time it had maximum sustained winds near 35 mph (55 kph) and was moving to the west-northwest at 13 mph (20 kph). Tropical Depression 2 is located near 16.2 north and 87.6 west, about 60 miles (95 km) east of Monkey River Town, Belize.

The center of the depression will move inland over southern Belize this afternoon where no change in strength is expected as it moves over land. The depression could emerge into the Bay of Campeche on Tuesday, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC). NHC noted that an increase in strength is possible on Tuesday if the center emerges into the Bay of Campeche. If that happens, Tropical Depression 2 could become Tropical Storm Barry.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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Page Last Updated: July 28th, 2013
Page Editor: NASA Administrator