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Tropical Storm Wukong (Western North Pacific)
12.28.12
 
NASA Sees Wukong Struggling to Survive in So. China Sea

Wukong

This image of Tropical Depression Wukong from 10:28 p.m. EST on Dec. 27 combines rainfall from NASA's TRMM satellite and the MTSAT-2 satellite. It showed one area of moderate rainfall (yellow) falling at a rate of about 1 inch/25 mm per hour. Most of the other precipitation in the storm is lighter and scattered.
Credit: NASA/NRL
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NASA's TRMM satellite captured rainfall data on Tropical Depression Wukong as it struggles to stay together in the South China Sea. Wukong has been battered with wind shear for days and NASA satellite data still shows an area of moderate rainfall within the dying storm.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed over Tropical Depression Wukong on Dec. 28 at 0328 UTC (10:28 p.m. EST, Dec. 27) and saw one area of moderate rainfall near the center of circulation. That area was generating a rainfall rate of about 1 inch/25 mm per hour. Most of the other precipitation in the storm is lighter and scattered.

On Dec. 28 at 0900 UTC (4 a.m. EST) Tropical Depression Wukong had maximum sustained winds near 25 knots (28.7 mph/46.3 kph). Satellite data helped pinpoint Wukong's center near 8.7 north latitude and 111.0 east longitude, about 280 miles (322 miles/518.6 km) east of Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam. Wukong continues to move to the west-southwest staying south of Vietnam.

Wukong is moving around the southern edge of a ridge (elongated) area of high pressure and being battered with moderate southeasterly vertical wind shear. According to the forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC), the wind shear has exposed the low level circulation center.

JTWC forecasters expect the depression to continue moving west-southwest over the next day or two before finally dissipating.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center




Dec. 27, 2012

NASA Sees Wukong's Remnants Being Blown Apart Over Large Area

NASA's AIRS instrument data showed that the main precipitation and convection (purple and dark blue) was pushed almost 200 nautical miles to the north. When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Wukong on Dec. 26 at 1747 UTC (12:47 p.m. EST), AIRS instrument data showed that the main precipitation and convection (purple and dark blue) was pushed almost 200 nautical miles to the north. Some of the heaviest precipitation appeared over Luzon. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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Wind shear has taken a toll on Tropical Storm Wukong, weakening it to a depression. Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite showed that while the center of Wukong moved into the South China Sea, the eastern extent of it is still causing trouble in the Philippines.

Early on Dec. 27, public storm warning signal #1 remained in effect in the Philippines for the Luzon provinces of Occidental Mindoro, Northern Palawan, Calamian Group of Islands and Cuyo Island. However, by 11 a.m. EST (1600 UTC), the warnings were dropped, and PAGASA, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration issued an advisory for "fishing boats and other small seacraft to stay in port from Luzon and Visayas due to the enhanced Northeast Monsoon." Wukong is known locally in the Philippines as Quinta.

In the final bulletin issued by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center on Dec. 26, Wukong's center was noted to be about 285 nautical miles (328 miles/527.8 km) south-southwest of Manila, near 10.5 north latitude and 118.6 east longitude.

Wukong was moving to the west-southwest near 14 knots (16.1 mph/25.9 kph), and its maximum sustained winds were down to 25 knots (28.7 mph/46.3 kph). Wukong was still generating 4.2 meter (14-foot) high seas causing coastal erosion and dangerous conditions along shorelines.

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Wukong on Dec. 26 at 1747 UTC (12:47 p.m. EST), the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured infrared imagery of the storm's clouds. The infrared imagery showed that the low level circulation center was fully exposed to outside winds as southerly vertical wind shear continues to tear the storm apart. The AIRS data also showed that the main precipitation and convection was pushed almost 200 nautical miles to the north. Some of the heaviest precipitation appeared over Luzon.

Radar imagery showed on Dec. 27, 2012 at 10:50 a.m. EST (1550 UTC) that rainfall from Wukong stretched from west of the island of Palawan east over Luzon, Philippines. Wukong had already crossed Palawan and moved into the South China Sea. Radar also showed that wind shear had blown Wukong apart, and it had a greater resemblance to a frontal system than a low pressure area, because its clouds stretched from southwest to northeast.

According to the Philippines National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC), six people, all from Iloilo, were killed from the storm. Over 13,000 people were affected in four provinces.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Wukong to dissipate over cool waters in the South China Sea within a day, while the clean up continues in the Philippines.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center




Dec. 20, 2012

NASA Satellites See Tropical Storm Wukong Lash the Philippines

Giant blue-red blob riding a swirl of clouds straight at the Philippines - shown in real color NASA's TRMM satellite captured this image of Wukong on Dec. 25, 2012 at 0303 UTC. An area of heavy rain (red areas) falling at a rate of over 50mm/hour (~2 inches) was located near the tropical depression's center of circulation. Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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split-pane view of technicolor tie-died paisley blob attacking the Philippines, shown as an outline map. The AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured these infrared images of Tropical Storm Wukong on Dec. 25 at 0453 UTC and Dec. 26 at 0535 UTC. The purple areas indicate the coldest cloud top temperatures and the strongest storms with heaviest rainfall. Over two days, Wukong's eastern band of thunderstorms has shifted in a more southerly direction. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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Tropical Storm Wukong is moving across the Visayas area of the Philippines on Dec. 26, and NASA's TRMM and Aqua satellites have been gathering data on the storm to help determine its strength and track.

There are many warnings up in the Philippines as Wukong, known locally as "Quinta" moves from east to west across the Visayas region. Public storm warning signal #1 is in effect in the Visayas provinces of Aklan, Capiz, Antique, Iloilo, Guimaras, Negros provinces, and Cebu; the Luzon provinces of Mindoro, Romblon, Masbate, Burias Island, northern Palawan, Calamian group of islands and Marinduque.

On Dec. 26 at 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST), Tropical Storm Wukong (Quinta) had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots (44 mph/64.8 kph). It was centered near 11.8 north latitude and 120.1 east longitude, about 170 nautical miles (195.6 miles/395.8 km) south of Manila, Philippines. Wukong was moving to the west at 11 knots (12.6 mph/20.3 kph).

On Dec. 25 Wukong was a depression. By 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST) Tropical Depression Wukong was lashing the Philippines. At that time, Wukong had maximum sustained winds near 30 knots (34 mph/55 kph). It was centered near 10.8N 125.2E, about 370 nautical miles southeast of Manila. Wukong was moving to the west-northwest at 13 knots (15 mph/24 kph) and was creating 15 foot high waves and causing coastal erosion. Satellite data showed a partially exposed low-level center, with limited deep convection (strong thunderstorms and heavy rain) over the northwestern quadrant.

Tropical depression Wukong isn't as powerful as Bopha but contained a large area of heavy rain. The TRMM satellite had a good daytime view of Wukong on December 25, 2012 at 0303 UTC. An analysis of data from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) instruments showed that an area of heavy rain was falling at a rate of over 50mm/hour (~2 inches) near the tropical depression's center of circulation.

Infrared imagery from Dec. 25 and 26 from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite revealed on Dec. 26 that convection (rising air that forms thunderstorms that make up the tropical storm) has decreased in intensity and in area as Wukong moves over land. AIRS infrared images of Tropical Storm Wukong were taken on Dec. 25 at 0453 UTC and Dec. 26 at 0535 UTC. The coldest cloud top temperatures and the strongest storms with heaviest rainfall appeared around the center of circulation. Over the two days, AIRS data shows that Wukong's eastern band of thunderstorms appeared to have shifted to a more southerly direction.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) noted on Dec. 26 at 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST) that the center was difficult to pinpoint as Wukong has weakened and become more disorganized over land.

The bulletin from the JTWC on Dec. 26 notes "As the system emerges over the open waters of the South China Sea in an area with increased upper level outflow, there is a narrow window where slight intensification may occur (for a short period of time)." Wind shear is expected to kick up and the Wukong is expected to weaken again by Dec. 28 as it moves through the South China Sea in a southwesterly direction. Current forecast models expect the center of Wukong to remain at sea over the next several days and curve south of southern Vietnam.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro/Hal Pierce
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center