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Hurricane Season 2012: Tropical Depression Dando (Southern Indian Ocean)
01.18.12
 
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Dando on January 16, 2012 at 07:50 UTC (2:50 a.m. EST). › Larger image
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Dando on January 16, 2012 at 07:50 UTC (2:50 a.m. EST). The MODIS instrument aboard Terra captured a visible image of the storm, and showed that it had good circulation with an identifiable center of circulation.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
Tropical Depression Dando Flooded Mozambique

NASA's Terra satellite captured a look at Tropical Depression Dando as it was making landfall on January 16 in Mozambique. Dando's light to moderate rains caused flooding and displaced residents of the capital city of Maputo. Dando has since dissipated.

NASA's Terra satellite passed over Dando on January 16, 2012 at 07:50 UTC (2:50 a.m. EST). The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Instrument aboard Terra captured a visible image of the storm, and showed that it had good circulation with an identifiable center of circulation. The bulk of clouds and rainfall associated with Dando at that time was within its southern quadrant, as the clouds appeared thicker and whiter on satellite imagery.

According to the Associated Press, almost 500 people were displaced from their homes in Maputo from the flooding generated from Tropical Depression Dando. Dando made landfall on January 16, 2012 bringing light to moderate rainfall and gusty winds. The rainfall may not have been heavy but it was enough to cause the closure of low-lying bridges and roads. All Africa.com reported on January 18 that areas of Mozambique are flooded.

Gusty winds from Dando caused damage to schools and homes in the Inhambane and Gaza provinces. Fortunately, there were no human deaths associated with the storm, however, AllAfrica.com reports as many as 1,000 goats perished in the Gaza province. Agricultural damages were also reported there.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Jan. 17, 2012

NASA's TRMM Satellite Sees Light Rainfall Over Mozambique from Depression Dando › Larger image
NASA's TRMM Satellite passed over the southernmost part of Tropical Depression Dando on January 16 and captured rainfall rates in the storm. TRMM saw light to moderate rainfall as depicted in blue and green. It was falling at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches (20 to 40 mm) per hour.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce



NASA's TRMM Satellite Sees Light Rainfall Over Mozambique from Depression Dando › Larger image
On January 15, 2012 at 11:23 UTC (6:23 a.m. EST) NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the developing Tropical Depression Dando and the AIRS instrument aboard the satellite captured an infrared image that showed some areas of high, strong thunderstorms (purple), where cloud top temperatures were colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius).
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA's TRMM Satellite Sees Light Rainfall Over Mozambique from Depression Dando

Dando was the name of a tropical depression that strengthened as quickly and made landfall over the coast of Mozambique this past weekend. NASA's TRMM satellite measured light to moderate rainfall over southern-most extent of the storm, while a large plume of moisture from Dando stretched far north in the Mozambique Channel on January 17.

On January 13, a low pressure area called System 93S formed near 24.5 South latitude and 48.9 East longitude, about 340 miles south-southeast of Antananarivo, Madagascar. At that time, the likelihood of tropical cyclone formation was low.

On January 15, 2012 at 11:23 UTC (6:23 a.m. EST) NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the developing Tropical Depression Dando and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard the satellite captured an infrared image of the storm. In infrared image showed that the low has developed good circulation and that there were some areas of high, strong thunderstorms, where cloud top temperatures were colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius). That temperature is a benchmark that indicates very high, strong thunderstorms. The strongest thunderstorms were northeast and southwest of the center of circulation.

Early on January 16, System 93S had moved quite a distance to the west and it developed just enough for a brief period before making landfall in Mozambique at 0900 UTC (4 a.m. EST) on January 16, to be classified as a tropical depression and renamed "Dando."

The United Kingdom's Met Office reported that Dando was the first tropical cyclone to make landfall in that area of Mozambique since 1984, when Tropical Storm Domoina came ashore.

When the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed over the southernmost portion of Dando on January 16, 2012 at 1941 UTC (2:41 p.m. EST), about 10 hours after landfall, light to moderate rains were falling along the Mozambique coast. The TRMM satellite is managed by NASA and the Japanese Space Agency, and data on Dando's rainfall was analyzed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. The data showed that rainfall was mostly light to moderate and falling at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches (20 to 40 mm) per hour.

Although Dando made landfall, a huge plume of moisture from Dando remains over the Mozambique Channel and stretches a couple of hundred miles to the northwest of the storm's center on January 17. That moisture plume is bringing rainfall over open waters in the Mozambique Channel as well as to the eastern coastal cities of Mozambique, from Angoche in the south, north to Nacala and further north to Pemba and Ancuabe.

At 11 a.m. EST on January 17, Dando's heaviest rainfall was over the open waters of the Mozambique Channel. The system is being watched for regeneration.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.