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Hurricane Season 2012: Typhoon Tembin (Northwest Pacific Ocean)
08.30.12
 
MODIS captured this visible, true-color image of Tembin at the time of landfall in southwestern South Korea. › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite's MODIS instrument captured this visible, true-color image of Tropical Storm Tembin at the time of landfall in southwestern South Korea. The image was captured at 04:45 UTC (12:45 a.m. EDT) on Aug. 30.
Credit: NASA Goddard /MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Sees Tropical Storm Tembin Make Landfall in South Korea

Tropical Storm Tembin made landfall in the in southwestern South Korea and NASA's Aqua satellite captured the extent of the storm's elongated cloud cover, revealing the effect of wind shear on the storm.

Tembin moved through the Myeongnyang Strait and made landfall on Aug. 30, 2012 at 0000 UTC (Aug. 29 at 8 p.m. EDT) in the southwestern tip of South Korea.

NASA's Aqua satellite's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument captured a visible, true-color image of Tropical Storm Tembin around the time of landfall in southwestern South Korea. The image was captured at 04:45 UTC (12:45 a.m. EDT) on Aug. 30, and showed an elongated storm stretching from southwestern South Korea, over North Korea and into the Sea of Japan. Southwesterly wind shear has also taken its toll on Tembin as the storm has become elongated. When a storm is no longer circular, it loses its energy.

Satellite imagery also revealed that central convection (rising air that forms thunderstorms that make up Tembin) have been decaying rapidly.

On Aug. 30 at 0300 UTC (Aug. 29 at 11 p.m. EDT) Tropical Storm Tembin's maximum sustained winds were near 35 knots (40 mph/65 kmh). It was located about 85 nautical miles (97.8 miles/157.4 km) south of Kunsan Air Base, South Korea, near 35.5 North and 127.2 East. Tembin is moving to the north-northeast at 23 knots (26.4 mph/42.6 kmh) and forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect the storm to continue accelerating and drag across the rugged Taebaek Mountain Range, further weakening it.

Tembin is then is expected to briefly enter the Sea of Japan as an extra-tropical low pressure area and dissipate thereafter.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 29, 2012

Tropical Storm Tembin on Aug. 29, 2012 at 02:25 UTC as it moved past Taiwan and into the Yellow Sea. › View larger image
The MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Tembin on Aug. 29, 2012 at 02:25 UTC as it moved past Taiwan and into the Yellow Sea.
Credit: NASA Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Sees Tropical Storm Tembin Moving into the Yellow Sea

Tropical Storm Tembin appears to finally be done raining on Taiwan. NASA satellite imagery on Aug. 29 shows that Tembin has moved north into the Yellow Sea.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Tembin on Aug. 29, 2012 at 02:25 UTC, revealing the center of circulation was now far north of Taiwan, and brushing eastern China.

On Aug. 29 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT/5 p.m. local time, Taiwan), Tropical Storm Tembin had maximum sustained winds near 50 knots (57.5 mph/92.6 kmh). It was located about 515 nautical miles (592.7 miles/953.8 km) south-southwest of Seoul, South Korea, near 29.9 North latitude and 124.3 East longitude. Tembin was moving to the north at 13 knots (15 mph/24 kmh).

Tembin is forecast to move northeast through the cooler waters of the Yellow Sea, which are expected to weaken the storm. The waters are cooler than the 80 degree Fahrenheit (26.6 Celsius) threshold needed to maintain a tropical cyclone.

Another factor expected to weaken Tembin on its northward journey is increasing wind shear. The farther north Tembin goes, the stronger the wind shear is expected to become, according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center.

However, Tembin is now taking a more southerly track in response to the remnants of former tropical storm Bolaven. Sometime on Thursday, Aug. 30, Tembin is forecast to make landfall in South Korea.

For a high resolution image of Tembin as seen by the MODIS instrument, visit: http://lance-modis.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=Tembin.A2012242.0225.1km.jpg .

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 28, 2012

MODIS image of Tembin› Large image
The MODIS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Typhoon Tembin on Aug. 28, 2012 at 04:50 UTC as it moved back over Taiwan. Credit: NASA Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team

TRMM image of Tembin› Larger image
NASA's TRMM satellite captured a view of Tembin's rainfall rates as Tembin was approaching southern Taiwan on August 27, 2012 at 0737 UTC (3:37 p.m. local time/3:37 a.m. EDT). The purple areas indicated the heaviest rainfall rates, near 70 mm (2.7 inches) per hour.
NASA Sees Typhoon Tembin Thrashing Taiwan Again

A powerful typhoon called Tembin that hit southern Taiwan last week has circled back toward Taiwan from the South China Sea. NASA satellite imagery on Aug. 28 shows that Tembin has returned to Taiwan as it moves north and parallels the coast.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite captured a view of Tembin's rainfall rates as Tembin was approaching southern Taiwan on August 27, 2012 at 0737 UTC (3:37 p.m. local time/3:37 a.m. EDT). TRMM data revealed that the heaviest rainfall rates, near 70 mm (2.7 inches) per hour were falling south of the center of circulation. The TRMM data was made into a rainfall image at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. TRMM is a satellite managed by NASA and the Japanese Space Agency, JAXA.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Typhoon Tembin on Aug. 28, 2012 at 04:50 UTC as its western side moved back over Taiwan. Tembin's center stayed off shore and is not expected to make landfall.

Microwave satellite data from the AMSU-B instrument on Aug. 28 indicated a partially exposed low-level circulation center, which means that it can be weakened more easily by outside winds. Tropical Storm Tembin has been struggling to maintain intensity as it moves over eastern Taiwan. In addition, a high pressure area located over Okinawa is battering Tembin with weak to moderate wind shear.

On Aug. 28 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT/5 p.m. local time, Taiwan), Tropical Storm Tembin had maximum sustained winds near 55 knots. It was located about 80 nautical miles southeast of Taipei, Taiwan near 24.7 North latitude and 122. 9 East longitude. Tembin was moving to the north-northeastward at 14 knots and generating very rough seas along the eastern coast of Taiwan, with wave heights to 27 feet.

Flash floods and landslides are possible in southeastern Taiwan as Tembin draws moisture from the Philippine Sea over Taiwan's mountainous terrain. Tembin is expected to continue tracking north-northeast in the Yellow Sea into cooler waters that are expected to weaken it. Tembin is expected to follow Typhoon Bolaven, which currently moving north through the Yellow Sea. By the end of the week, Tembin is forecast to make landfall in southwestern North Korea.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro/Hal Pierce
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 27, 2012

NASA Sees Typhoon Bolaven Dwarf Typhoon Tembin

AIRS image of Tembin and Bolaven› Larger image
The AIRS instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Typhoon Tembin southwest of Taiwan and Typhoon Bolaven entering the Yellow Sea on Aug. 26. AIRS has been providing infrared data about cloud temperatures, and sea surface temperatures around the storm. The purple areas indicate the highest, coldest cloud top temperatures. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen

MODIS image of Tembin and Bolaven› Large image
NASA's MODIS instrument that flies onboard the Terra satellite captured this remarkable image of Typhoon Tembin (lower left) being dwarfed by giant Typhoon Bolaven (top right)in the Philippine Sea at 0240 UTC on Aug. 27, 2012. Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA satellites are providing imagery and data on Typhoon Tembin southwest of Taiwan, and Typhoon Bolaven is it barrels northwest through the Yellow Sea. In a stunning image from NASA's Aqua satellite, Bolaven appears twice as large as Tembin.

NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies onboard the Terra satellite captured a remarkable image of Typhoon Tembin being dwarfed by giant Typhoon Bolaven at 0240 UTC on Aug. 27, 2012. The visible image shows that the island of Taiwan appears to be squeezed between the two typhoons, while the northeastern arm of Typhoon Tembin's clouds extend over the southern half of Taiwan and sweep over Luzon, the Philippines, where it is better known as Typhoon Igme. Bolaven appears to be twice as large as Typhoon Tembin and has a visible eye. Tembin's eye appears obscured by high clouds in satellite imagery.

Typhoon Bolaven recently passed over Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan as it moves northwestward into the Yellow Sea for a final landfall later this week in North Korea. Clouds from Bolaven's northeastern quadrant were blanketing Japan's island of Kyushu, which is the southwestern most island of the four main islands of Japan. The Yellow Sea is an arm of the North Pacific of the East China Sea, and it is situated between China and Korea.

On Aug. 26, NASA's Aqua satellite captured both storms in one infrared image. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured an infrared image of Typhoon Tembin southwest of Taiwan and Typhoon Bolaven entering the Yellow Sea. AIRS has been providing infrared data about cloud temperatures, and sea surface temperatures around the storm. Both storms had large areas of very cold clout top temperatures that exceeded -63F/-52C) indicating strong uplift in each storm. At the time of the image, Bolaven was moving over the Ryukyu Islands. They are a chain of islands owned by Japan that stretch southwest from Kyushu, Japan to Taiwan.

On Aug. 27, infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed that Bolaven maintained tightly-curved banding of thunderstorms that were wrapping into a well-defined and large low-level circulation center. The center of circulation is as large as 550 nautical miles in diameter!

Typhoon Bolaven in the Yellow Sea

On Aug. 27, 2012, Typhoon Bolaven was moving through the Yellow Sea. Its maximum sustained winds were down to 70 knots (80.5 mph/129.6 kmh). Bolaven was located approximately 380 nautical miles (437.3 miles/703.8 km) south-southwest of Seoul, South Korea, near 32.2 North and 125.0 East. The typhoon is moving to the north-northwestward at 16 knots (18.4 mph/29.6 kmh) and creating high seas of 43 feet (13.1 meters).

Bolaven is expected to weaken as it moves into cooler waters in the Yellow Sea. It is also expected to run into stronger wind shear. Bolaven is expected to make landfall in southwestern North Korea on Aug. 28.

Typhoon Tembin Ready to Move North

Typhoon Tembin completed its cyclonic loop south of Taiwan, and is now poised to move northeast and pass Taiwan on its journey behind Bolaven, into the Yellow Sea. On Aug. 27 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Tembin had maximum sustained winds near 65 knots (75 mph/120.4 kmh) making it a minimal typhoon. It was located about 240 nautical (276 miles/444.5 km) miles south-southwest of Taipei, Taiwan near 21.6 North and 120.4 East. It was moving to the east-northeast near 14 knots (16.1 mph/26 kmh). AIRS infrared data showed that Tembin showed an eye covered by central dense overcast, as correlated by the MODIS visible imagery.

Tembin is expected to move north past Taiwan over the next couple of days, and track through the Yellow Sea. Tembin's final resting place will be a landfall in southeastern China, near the North Korea border by the weekend.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 24, 2012

MODIS image of Tembin› Larger image
On Aug. 24 at 05:15 UTC (12:15 a.m. EDT), NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Typhoon Tembin after it had crossed southern Taiwan and re-emerged into the waters of the Philippine Sea. Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

TRMM image of Tembin› Larger image
NASA's TRMM satellite saw Tembin on August 23, 2012 at 0943 UTC as it was approaching Taiwan as a typhoon. TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) data showed that Tembin had rain bands containing intense thunderstorms dropping rain at over 100mm/hr west of a well defined eye. A 3-D view from TRMM PR reveals the vertical structure within Tembin. Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Tropical Storm Tembin Crossed Over Taiwan, Back Over Water

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Tembin after it made a quick track across southern Taiwan and re-emerged over the open waters of the Philippine Sea.

On Aug. 24 at 05:15 UTC (12:15 a.m. EDT), NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Tropical Storm Tembin and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument captured a visible image of the storm after it had crossed southern Taiwan and re-emerged into the waters of the Philippine Sea. After Tembin interacted with the land, the storm's eye was no longer visible. The storm has also become somewhat larger since crossing Taiwan and weakening. Tropical-storm-force winds extend out 145 nautical miles (170 miles/268.5 km) from the center making the storm 290 nautical miles (333.7 miles/537.1 km) in diameter.

Warnings are still in effect in Taiwan on Aug. 24. Warning areas include: Nantou County, Yunlin County, Chiayi County, Chiayi City, Tainan City, Kaohsiung City, Pingtung County, Hualien County, Taitung County, Hengchun Peninsula, Penghu County. In the Philippines, warnings are also still in effect. Public storm warning signal #2 is in effect for the Batanes group of islands, and Public storm warning signal #1 is in effect for the Calayan and Babuyan group of islands.

On Aug. 24, Tropical Storm Tembin (known as Igme in the Philippines) had maximum sustained winds near 60 knots (69 mph/111 kmh). It was located about 180 nautical miles (207.1 miles/222.4 km) south-southwest of Taipei, Taiwan, near 22.3 North and 119.8 East. Tembin was moving to the west-southwest near 5 knots (5.7 mph/9.26 kmh) and is expected to loop.

Typhoon Bolaven is over 700 nautical miles (805 miles/1,296 km) away and doesn't appear to have any effect on Tropical Storm Tembin. Tembin is expected to make a cyclonic loop over the ocean and then head northeast through the Taiwan Strait, skirting the east coast of Taiwan as it moves toward South Korea early next week.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.









Aug. 23, 2012

Twin Typhoons Tembin and Bolaven Appear Same Size on Satellite Imagery

MODIS image of Bolaven and Tembin› Larger image
This visible image was taken at 04:35 UTC (12:35 a.m. EDT) on Aug. 23, 2012 of Typhoons Tembin and Bolaven in the Philippine Sea, by the MODIS instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite. Credit: NASA MODIS Rapid Response Team

AIRS image of Bolaven and Tembin› Larger image
The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of the eastern edge of Typhoon Tembin and most of Typhoon Bolaven on Aug. 23 at 12:29 a.m. EDT in the Philippine Sea. Strong thunderstorms had cloud top temperatures as cold as -63F (-52C) (in purple). Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoons Tembin and Bolaven in the Philippine Sea on Aug. 23, satellite data showed that they're about the same size in diameter. That means a wide path of heavy rainfall, gusty winds and rough seas for the Philippine Sea.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over both storms on Aug. 23 at 12:35 a.m. EDT (04:35 UTC) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument captured a visible image of both storms. MODIS imagery indicates that Tembin is about 280 nautical miles (322 miles/518.6 km) in diameter. Bolaven is about the same size. That's about the distance from Boston, Mass. to Philadelphia, Penn.

Typhoon Bolaven Headed for Okinawa Landfall

Typhoon Bolaven's maximum sustained winds were near 100 knots (115 mph/185 kmh) on Aug. 23 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) as it continued on its west-northwest track through the Philippine Sea. It is moving at 9 knots (10.3 mph/16.6 kmh) and was about 500 nautical miles (575.4 miles/926 km) southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. Bolaven's center was near 20.4 North latitude and 133.6 East longitude. Bolaven is expected to track over or near Kadena Air Base around 1200 UTC on Aug. 25, and the island will experience rough seas and gusty winds over the next day as Bolaven nears.

Another instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite measured cloud top temperatures infrared light and showed high, very cold cloud top temperatures which are an indication of strong uplift within the storm. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument also showed that the central dense overcast has strengthened over the low-level circulation center.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Bolaven to strengthen and peak at 120 knots (138 mph/222 kmh) by Aug. 25 before making landfall in Okinawa.

Typhoon Tembin Poised for Taiwan Landfall

Typhoon Tembin has regained strength as it heads for landfall in eastern Taiwan. Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect the storm to make landfall on Aug. 24 around 0000 UTC (Aug. 23 at 8 p.m. EDT) in southeastern Taiwan and then make a cyclonic loop after re-emerging in the Philippine Sea later on Aug. 24. Tembin is known in the Philippines as Typhoon Igme.

Warnings are posted for the following areas in Taiwan: Changhua County, Chiayi County, Chiayi City, Hualien County, Hsinchu City and County, Kaohsiung City, Miaoli County, Nantou County, Pingtung County, Taitung County, Hengchun Peninsula, Penghu County, Taichung City, Tainan City, Yilan County, and Yunlin County.

Warnings are still posted in areas of the Philippines as well. Those warnings include Public storm warning signal #2 for the Batanes group of islands and Public storm warning signal #1 for the Calayan and Babuyan group of islands.

On Aug. 23 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC), Typhoon Tembin's maximum sustained winds were near 105 knots (121 mph/194.5 kmh). It was located near 22.7 North latitude and 122.0 East longitude, about 150 nautical miles (172.6 miles/277.8 km) south-southeast of Taipei, Taiwan. Tembin is moving to the west at 6 knots (7 mph/11 kmh) and toward a landfall in Taiwan.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 22, 2012

Double Trouble Continues in the Philippine Sea: Tembin and Bolaven

storms Tembin and Bolaven

This is a combination of two images taken from the AIRS instrument that flies onboard NASA's Aqua satellite. It shows Typhoon Tembin near Taiwan and Tropical Storm Bolaven west of the Marianas Islands. The images were taken on Aug. 21 at 04:41 UTC and 16:47 UTC. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
› Larger image

Typhoon Tembin and Typhoon Bolaven continue to churn in the Philippine Sea, and infrared satellite data from NASA showed the power within both storms.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies onboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured imagery of both storms on Aug. 21 in two different overpasses. Aqua flies over the same locations during early morning and early afternoon (local time) as it orbits the Earth. Aqua passed over the Philippine Sea on Aug. 21 at 04:41 UTC (12:41 a.m. EDT) and 16:47 UTC (12:47 p.m. EDT). The two satellite passes were combined to show the proximity of the storms from each other. Typhoon Tembin is located east of Taiwan and Typhoon Bolaven west of the Marianas Islands.

The AIRS image of Typhoon Tembin showed a wide area of very high, cold cloud top temperatures, exceeding -63 Fahrenheit (-052 Celsius) surrounding the eye of the storm, which has warmer temperatures (indicating open air). The AIRS data revealed a large area of strong thunderstorms north, east and south of the center of Typhoon Bolaven.

According to forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, Typhoon Tembin is headed for landfall in Taiwan on Thursday, Aug. 23. On August 22 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Tembin's maximum sustained winds were near 90 knots (103 mph/167 kmh). The storm is about 260 nautical miles (299 miles/481.5 km) in diameter, larger than it was 24 hours before. Tembin was located about 210 nautical miles (241.7 miles/388.9 km) southeast of Taipei, Taiwan, near 22.5 North and 124.2 East. It was moving to the northwest at 5 knots (5.7 mph/9.2 kmh).

Taiwan warnings currently in effect include the counties of Yilan, Hualien and Taitung. As Tembin's southern edge skirts the northern Philippines, warnings are still effect there for the Batanes group of Islands.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 21, 2012

visible light hurricanes against ocean MODIS images from NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites on August 21, 2012 at 04:45 UTC were combined to provide a complete picture of the two tropical troublemakers in the northwestern Pacific: Typhoon Tembin and Tropical Storm Bolaven. Credit: NASA MODIS Rapid Response Team
› Larger image
NASA Satellites See Two Intensifying Northwestern Pacific Tropical Cyclones

There's double trouble in the northwestern Pacific Ocean in the form of Typhoon Tembin and Tropical Storm Bolaven. NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites teamed up to provide a look at both storms in one view.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument flies onboard NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites and the MODIS instrument on each captured a storm when both satellites flew over them on August 21 after midnight (Eastern Daylight Time). The two MODIS images which featured Bolaven and Tembin over the Philippine Sea were combined by NASA's MODIS Rapid Response Team at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. to paint the entire tropical picture in the northwestern Pacific Ocean on August 21.

Typhoon Tembin Tracking to Taiwan

Typhoon Tembin is also known as Typhoon Igme in the Philippines, where it is still the cause for active warnings on Aug. 21. Public storm warning signal #1 remains in effect for the Batanes group of islands on Aug. 21. At 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) on Aug. 21, Typhoon Tembin had maximum sustained winds near 110 knots (126.6 mph/203.7 kmh). Typhoon-force winds extended out to 30 nautical miles (34.5 miles/55.5 km) from the center, while tropical-storm-force winds extended out 100 nautical miles (115 miles/185 km) from the center, making Tembin over 200 nautical miles (230 miles/370 km) wide.

Tembin was located about 325 nautical miles (374 miles/602 km) southeast of Taipei, Taiwan, near 21.0 North latitude and 125.4 East longitude. Although Tembin is currently moving to the north-northeast, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecasts Tembin to intensify and take a western turn and head across Taiwan on Thursday, Aug. 23. After crossing Taiwan, Tembin is forecast to make a second landfall east of Hong Kong. A Sea Warning and Typhoon Warning is already in effect for Taiwan, as heavy rain and rough seas are expected to affect eastern Taiwan by Wednesday, Aug.22. The Central Weather Bureau indicated that Tembin will likely make landfall in the Yilan, Hualien or Taitung counties on the eastern coast.

Tropical Storm Bolaven Poised to Strengthen

Tropical storm Bolaven's maximum sustained winds were near 55 knots (63.2 mph/102 kmh) and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects it to strengthen into a typhoon over the next several days. At 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) on Aug. 21, Bolaven was located about 390 nautical miles (449 miles/722 km) south of Iwo To, near 18.4 North latitude and 140.4 West longitude. Bolaven is crawling to the west-northwest at 4 knots (4.6 mph/7.4 kmh).

Bolaven appears on MODIS imagery as a smaller storm than Tembin. While Tembin is over 200 nautical miles (230 miles/370 km) in diameter, Bolaven is just about 100 nautical miles (115 miles/185 km) in diameter.

Bolaven is strengthening and is expected to become a typhoon as it heads northwest. It is currently expected to pass to the north of Taiwan around Aug. 25-26, 2012.

For a high resolution image of both storms in one image, visit:
http://lance-modis.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=TembinBolaven.A2012234.0445.4km.jpg

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 20, 2012

MODIS captured this visible image of Typhoon Temin on August 20, 2012 showing a very clear eye. › View larger image When NASA's Terra satellite flew over Typhoon Tembin early on August 20, 2012 at 10:35 a.m. local time Manila, Philippines it captured a visible image of the storm. The 25 nautical-mile-wide (28.7 mile/46.3 km) eye was very clear and cloud free in the visible image.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
Typhoon Tembin Forms Fast in Philippines

NASA's Terra satellite captured the newest Typhoon in the western North Pacific Ocean, Tembin, as it moves parallel to Luzon, Philippines. Warm waters were the trigger in rapid intensification of the typhoon.

Typhoon Tembin grew from the fifteenth tropical depression over the weekend of August 18-19, and by Monday, August 20 was a powerful typhoon. At 5 a.m. EDT on August 20, forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that Tembin "rapidly intensified over the past 24 hours" going from a 35-knot (40.2 mph/64.8 kmh) intensity on August 19 at 2 a.m. EDT to 95 knots (109.3 mph/175.9 kmh) on August 20 at 2 a.m. EDT.

When NASA's Terra satellite flew over Typhoon Tembin early on August 20, 2012 at 0235 UTC (10:35 a.m. local time Manila, Philippines/Aug. 19 10:35 p.m. EDT) the MODIS instrument (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) captured a visible image of the storm. The 25 nautical-mile-wide (28.7 mile/46.3 km) eye was very clear and cloud free in the visible image.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that Tembin has maximum sustained winds near 95 knots (109.3 mph/175.9 kmh). At 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT/5 p.m. local time, Manila), Tembin was located 320 nm (368.2 miles/592.6 km) northeast of Manila, Philippines, near 18.7 North latitude and 124.9 East longitude. Tembin is moving slowly to the north-northeast at 4 knots (4.6 mph/7.4 kmh). It is expected to track north and then turn west, and head across Taiwan by August 23.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.