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Hurricane Season 2012: Tropical Storm Talim (North Pacific Ocean/South China Sea)
06.21.12
 
AIRS captured this infrared image of Tropical Depression Talim on June 21 at 3:29 a.m. EDT.› View larger image
NASA's AIRS instrument (on the Aqua satellite) captured this infrared image of Tropical Depression Talim on June 21 at 3:29 a.m. EDT. The remaining scattered strongest thunderstorms have high, cold cloud tops of -63F (-52C).
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Tropical Depression Talim Becoming Disorganized

Tropical Storm Talim has weakened overnight due to stronger wind shear and land interaction and is now a depression. NASA satellite data from June 21 revealed that the thunderstorms that make up the tropical cyclone are scattered and disorganized.

NASA's Aqua satellite Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured an infrared image of Tropical Depression Talim on June 21 at 3:29 a.m. EDT. The imagery showed several areas of strong thunderstorms, but they're now scattered in nature as a result of the two factors. As Talim moved over Taiwan and interacted with the land it weakened. Another factor that added to its rapid weakening was an increase in vertical wind shear (winds that batter a storm)from a nearby frontal system. The AIRS data did reveal that some of those scattered thunderstorms were still strong and had high, cold cloud tops of -63 Fahrenheit or -52 Celsius. Those thunderstorms were still dropping heavy rainfall and were occurring mostly over open water at the time of the AIRS image.

On June 21, 2012 at 0000 UTC (June 20 at 8 p.m. EDT/U.S.), Talim's maximum sustained winds were down to 25 knots (28.7 mph/46.3 kph). At that time, Talim was 100 nautical miles (115 miles/185 km) northeast of Taipei, Taiwan and moving east-northeast at 15 knots (17.2 mph/27.7 kph).

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect the depression to dissipate later today as it interacts with a frontal boundary that stretches from the Sea of Japan to the South China Sea. That system is expected to brush Kyushu Island, Japan.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



June 20, 2012
This image of rainfall rates within Tropical Storm Talim were obtained with NASA's TRMM satellite on June 20.› View larger image
This image of rainfall rates within Tropical Storm Talim were obtained with NASA's TRMM satellite on June 20. The yellow, green and blue areas indicate light-to-moderate rainfall between 20 and 40 millimeters (.78 to 1.57 inches) per hour. The red area is considered heavy rainfall at 2 inches/50 mm per hour and is occurring around the center of circulation in the area where "hot towers" were noted on satellite imagery.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
This TRMM 3-D image shows the heights of powerful storms near Talim's center in the Strait Of Taiwan.› View larger image
This TRMM 3-D image uses data from TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument to show the heights of powerful storms near Talim's center in the Strait Of Taiwan. Some powerful storms are shown reaching heights of about 16km (~9.9 miles). Rainfall rates for the red areas are around 2 inches/50mm per hour.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
This rainfall graph (top) shows the rainfall totals in southern Taiwan since the beginning of June to June 20.› View larger image
This rainfall graph (top), created using TRMM data shows the rainfall totals in southern Taiwan near 600mm (~23.6 inches) since the beginning of June to June 20. Average rainfall is about 120 mm. The bottom graph shows rainfall rates in millimeters per hour, peaking near 50mm/hr or 2 inches/hr. as Talim brought rains to southern Taiwan.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
TRMM rainfall data is helpful in determining areas with flooding and landslide potential.› View larger image
TRMM rainfall data is helpful in determining areas with flooding and landslide potential. This graphic shows that Taiwan is succeptable (red) to landslides from Talim's heavy rainfall, and north central Japan later in the week as Talim moves northeast.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
NASA Follows Tropical Storm Talim's Heavy Rainfall Over Taiwan

Tropical storm Talim has produced torrential rainfall over southern Taiwan as it pumped warm moist air from the South China Sea over mountainous terrain. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite called TRMM flew over tropical storm Talim in the Taiwan Strait on June 20, 2012 at 0140 UTC and captured its heavy rainfall.

TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) data from this orbit shows that tropical storm Talim was dropping rainfall at a rate of almost 50mm/hr (2 inches/hr)over Taiwan. TRMM data captured with that orbit showed that the most intense rainfall of over 50mm/hr (~2 inches) was located over the Strait of Taiwan.

Flash flooding and landslides are probable in southern Taiwan due to heavy rainfall contributed by tropical storm Talim. That area of Taiwan has received almost 600 mm (~23.6 inches) of rainfall over the past week. Maps of potential landslide areas resulting from heavy rainfall are routinely produced and shown on the TRMM web site at trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov.

The 3-D image created using data from TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument showed the heights of powerful storms near Talim's center were reaching heights of about 16km (~9.9 miles).

On June 20 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT/U.S.) Talim was located near 24.5 North and 120.1 East, about 85 miles west-southwest of Taipei, Taiwan. Talim is moving east-northeast near 16 knots (18.4 mph/29.6 kph), and has maximum sustained winds near 40 knots (46 mph/74 kph).

After Talim departs the Strait of Taiwan, its next stop is Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan, located on Kyushu Island, where more heavy rain is expected.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.






















































June 19, 2012
Click here to see an animation that fades between a visible/infrared image and TMI PR rainfall data with tropical storm Talim from the TRMM orbit of June 18, 2012. The red areas indicate the heaviest rainfall, falling at a rate of 2 inches/50 mm per hour. Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce


On June 18, 2012 TRMM saw Tropical Storm Talim forming in the South China Sea east of Hainan Island, China.› View larger image
On June 18, 2012 at 0331 UTC the TRMM satellite saw Tropical Storm Talim forming in the South China Sea east of Hainan Island, China. It showed that a large area of moderate to heavy rainfall was associated with Talim. The heaviest rainfall, dropping at a rate of about 40mm/hr (1.6 inches), was located southeast of Talim's center of circulation.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Infrared image of TALIM taken on June 19 by AIRS shows that the bulk of the strongest convection was southwest of the center› View larger image
NASA Sees Some Heavy Rainfall in Tropical Storm Talim

Tropical Storm Talim formed in the South China Sea yesterday, June 18, just south of Hainan Island, China, and NASA's TRMM satellite captured rainfall data right after its birth, revealing some heavy rain.

On June 18, 2012 at 0331 UTC The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite saw Talim forming in the South China Sea east of Hainan Island, China. TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) data showed that a large area of moderate to heavy rainfall was associated with Talim. TRMM revealed that the heaviest rainfall, dropping at a rate of about 40mm/hr (1.6 inches), was located southeast of Talim's center of circulation.

On June 19, 2012, infrared satellite data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite showed the convection (rising air that forms thunderstorms that make up the cyclone) was strengthening and expanding around the center. There are also bands of thunderstorms pushed to the southwest, from strong (30 knot) northeasterly wind shear.

On June 19 at 1500 UTC, Tamil's maximum sustained winds are near 50 knots (57.5 mph/92.6 kph). This storm is about 240 nautical miles (276 miles/444.5 km) in diameter, smaller than Tropical Storm Guchol, which is around 360 miles. Talim is currently centered near 21.6 North and 116.9 East, about 360 nautical miles southwest of Taipei, Taiwan and is moving northeastward at 11 knots (12.6 mph/20.3 kph). It is generating high waves in the South China Sea, with wave heights reaching 26 feet (7.9 meters).

Talim is moving northeast towards the Strait of Taiwan. The system is at peak intensity and will start to weaken as it passes through the Strait of Taiwan, to undergo extra-tropical transitioning to the south of Japan. Currently, it is expected to move across Japan, and that would make it the second tropical storm to hit the big island within a week.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



June 18, 2012
NASA's TRMM satellite captured a look at rainfall occurring in newborn Tropical Storm Talim in the South China Sea› View larger image
NASA's TRMM satellite captured a look at rainfall occurring in newborn Tropical Storm Talim in the South China Sea on June 18, 2012 at 0331 UTC. Areas in blue and green represent light to moderate rainfall, falling at a rate between 0.78 and 1.5 7inches (20-40 mm) . The bulk of the rainfall was occurring on the southern and western quadrants of the storm.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
AIRS passed over Talim on June 18, and captured infrared data about its cloudtop temperatures.› View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Talim on June 18 at 0617 UTC (2:17 a.m. EDT), and captured infrared data about its cloudtop temperatures. Data showed that the western quadrant of the storm extended over Vietnam, bringing some rainfall there today, June 18. The strongest thunderstorms, however, were still off-shore at the time, where cloud top temperatures (purple) exceeded -63F (-52C), and that's where the heaviest rainfall was occurring.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Reveals Heaviest Rainfall in Tropical Storm Talim's Southwestern Side

Tropical Storm Talim was born today in the South China Sea, and NASA's TRMM satellite noticed the heaviest rainfall in the storm is occurring in the south and western quadrants of the storm. NASA's Aqua Satellite noticed that some of Talim's rainfall is reaching Vietnam.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite captured a look at rainfall occurring in newborn Tropical Storm Talim in the South China Sea on June 18, 2012 at 0331 UTC. Areas in blue and green represent light to moderate rainfall, falling at a rate between 0.78 and 1.5 7inches (20-40 mm). Some of the thunderstorms near the center of circulation were approaching 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) high.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Talim on June 18 at 0617 UTC (2:17 a.m. EDT), and captured infrared data about its cloudtop temperatures. Data showed that the western quadrant of the storm extended over Vietnam, bringing some rainfall there today, June 18.

The strongest thunderstorms, however, were still off-shore at the time, where cloud top temperatures exceeded -63F (-52C), and that's where the heaviest rainfall was occurring.

Forecasters expect that today's brush with Vietnam will be its only encounter with that country, as Talim is now heading northeast, and toward Taiwan. On June 18, 2012 at 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT/U.S.) maximum sustained winds were near 45 knots (52 mph/83 kph). Talim was crawling to the northeast at 3 knots (3.4 mph/5.5 kph) and is currently 185 nautical miles (213 miles/342.6 km) south-southwest of Hong Kong.

Sea surface temperatures in the South China Sea are warm enough to keep Talim going and forecasters expect Talim to strengthen on its journey to the northeast. Talim is expected to reach the Taiwan Strait in two days.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.